With Apple, everything old is new again


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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Whoever said “out with the old, in with the new” clearly wasn’t talking about Apple’s playbook.

The company may have its fair share of new and updated devices, but it’s also made a habit of building off of its existing devices—and not just in terms of spec bumps and speed boosts, but in actively finding ways to use old products as launching points for brand new devices. It’s a move that most companies probably couldn’t pull off, but one with which Apple has had great success—and which it will probably continue to use in the future.

Something in the Air

When Apple launched the redesigned 11-inch and 12.9-inch iPad Pros late last year, it discontinued the 10.5-inch iPad Pro after only a little over a year of service. Apple’s certainly no stranger to quick turnarounds on products—remember the seven-month reign of the third-generation iPad?—but it seemed extra Continue reading "With Apple, everything old is new again"

What is dead may never die: Two products Apple may be looking to revive


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Apple’s not a company that’s ever been afraid to kill off its products. At the height of the iPod mini’s popularity, Steve Jobs famously axed it in order to introduce the iPod nano. The underperforming iPod Hi-Fi got the hook, and in recent years we’ve said goodbye to both the AirPort line and most of the iPods.

But when a product lies fallow for many years, sitting without an update, it hangs in that liminal space between life and death, leading many to wonder whether it still has a future. Is it ready to shuffle off this mortal coil or could it be rescued from the edge of the abyss? The Mac mini, MacBook Air, and even the Mac Pro have seen this kind of revival in recent months, and just in the last week, two Apple products thought to have run out of time have been the Continue reading "What is dead may never die: Two products Apple may be looking to revive"

The future of Apple is playing well with others


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Apple’s not known for being the most outward-looking organization. For much of its existence, it’s seemed to project an aura of indifference—verging on ignorance—of what goes on outside its walls. That’s in large part by design: Apple has always had a carefully cultivated veneer of being in a league of its own, eschewing any need to pay attention to what its would-be rivals were up to.

Even when it has deigned to work with others, Apple generally presented an attitude of doing this as a favor to its partners, bestowing some small iota of the Apple brand and mojo upon them. (Remember its deals with Motorola and HP in the 2000s?) There’s no better example than porting iTunes to Windows—arguably one of the best business decisions Apple made, since it brought the iPod to scads of PC users—a move that Steve Jobs famously, if not decorously, described as “giving Continue reading "The future of Apple is playing well with others"

Apple’s revenue drop is about China and more


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All anybody is likely to be talking about for the next week or so is Apple’s admission that it’s going to miss its guidance for the first quarter of 2019. We won’t get any more information until the company’s next quarterly financial results, due out on January 29, and the winter is genuinely a dreary time for any other significant Apple news.

So, yeah, let’s jump right in. The water’s fine.

The China Syndrome

Apple’s been betting big on China for the last several years, a fact borne out both by Tim Cook’s repeated visits to the region and his fairly consistent declarations of the fact on those quarterly conference calls. The reason for that is pretty simple: the biggest opportunity for Apple’s growth is in the world’s second-largest economy, where there’s a rapidly increasing middle class that is looking to spend money on consumer goods.

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What to expect from Apple in 2019


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Seems like just yesterday I was running down what to look for in 2018, but the Earth has made it around the sun once again, which means that we’re once again poised to embark upon a new year of Apple news.

While there are some things that we can always reasonably expect from Apple in any given year—a new iPhone, probably at least one iPad revision, and some new Macs—2019 is unusual in that we already have several strong indications of announcements to expect from the company. Here’s a quick look at several things that I’m keeping an eye over the next twelve months.

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Apple’s biggest moves in 2018


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If there’s one thing about 2018 on which we can all agree it’s that it’ll be over soon. For Apple, this has been another blockbuster year filled with new products, major strategic moves, and more than a few decisions that have left us scratching our heads. (AirPower? Why?)

In advance of this year drawing to a close, it’s the perfect time to look back at what just might prove to be the most significant actions that Apple has taken in the past 12 months.

In the house

One of the biggest trends for Apple over the past decade has been increasing the amount of the iPhone that it designs itself. That’s gone way past the surface level, and even past decisions as central as the CPU, all the way down to designing individual chips that handle specific subsystems.

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What Apple’s new job additions tell us about its product plans


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Apple’s well known for its centralized approach, not just in terms of hardware and software, but also in geography. The company has previously pushed hard to locate as many of its non-retail employees as possible in its hometown of Cupertino, in large part because of its belief that its employees work better on physically proximate teams. Look no further than its enormous new home base, Apple Park, which opened there earlier this year.

But this week, the company announced that it would be expanding its footprint in several U.S. cities outside the Bay Area, most notably in Austin, Texas, where it already has its largest non-Cupertino presence, but also in a few other key locations. In particular, Apple projects that in the next three years it will exceed 1000 employees in three cities: Seattle, San Diego, and Culver City.

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3 features from other Apple products that the Mac and iPhone need


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Every year, it seems like Apple comes out with at least one significant new implementation of technology. The issue is that it isn't always distributed evenly across the company's product line-up. Even devices that seem like they could benefit from Apple's latest and greatest additions often get left out in the cold.

That's particularly frustrating, given that one of Apple's strongest selling points in recent years has been how well all of its technology works together across hardware, software, and services. Bringing that kind of relationship to its devices really emphasizes the idea of the ecosystem being a whole, instead of independent platforms.

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Chips ahoy: The Mac’s transition to Apple processors is happening sooner than you think


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The recent Apple event in New York City had a lot going on, and we’re still working through all the new products the company showed off. But as the dust clears, there’s one lasting impression about which I feel remarkably certain.

There’s a sea change coming.

John Gruber alluded to this in his piece at Daring Fireball about the new MacBook Air:

Look at the iPad’s A12X compared to the iPhone’s A12 and you can see how much attention Apple is paying to the iPad’s system architecture. There’s no reason they won’t pay as much or more attention to the Mac’s custom silicon when they switch from Intel to their own chip designs. It should be downright glorious.

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4 Apple products and technologies that are running out of time


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What is dead may never die, as the Ironborn of Game of Thrones are fond of saying. This week, Apple resurrected both the MacBook Air and the Mac mini at its event, proving that death is sometimes only a temporary state of affairs—at least where tech products are concerned.

But just as this week’s Apple event giveth, there’s also the suggestion that it might taketh away; some Apple products and technologies find themselves in limbo after the announcements of the week, meaning that the writing may perhaps be on the wall for them.

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The iPad Pro and the MacBook are on a collision course


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While there are a number of large and small announcements expected at Apple’s event next week, there’s one big-picture issue that cuts across at least two of the company’s product lines: the future of its mobile computing devices.

With rumors of a new iPad Pro and new iPad mini plus the possibility that a MacBook Air refresh or successor will see the light of day, Apple’s line of mobile devices is potentially about to get some big updates. But as these products grow closer together, I’ve started to wonder about Apple’s mobile computing strategy.

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What to look for at Apple’s Oct. 30 event, besides iPads and Macs


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Well, it’s just another quiet week here in the Apple worl—JUST KIDDING! Thursday brought news that Apple has another event in the works, this one coming just before the end of October in a slightly unusual location: Brooklyn, New York.

As with any Apple event, there’s plenty of speculation about what the October 30 show could bring. So far, those whispers have largely been about new iPads with Face ID and edge-to-edge displays, and possibly a new Mac mini and/or consumer-level MacBook. Plus, of course, there’s always the expectation of there being a few surprises up the company’s sleeves.

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3 features Apple should borrow from Google’s latest hardware


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For obvious reasons, we spend a lot of time focusing on Apple here, but let’s take a moment to turn our attention to another tech company (yes, there are others!) that competes in many of the same spaces as Apple.

This week, Google introduced a slew of new devices, from new smartphones to a tablet to a smart home speaker with a screen. And while there will always be those who prefer one company’s products to another, it’s important to have competition in this space in order to drive all companies—including Apple—forward.

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3 features Apple should borrow from Google’s latest hardware


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




For obvious reasons, we spend a lot of time focusing on Apple here, but let’s take a moment to turn our attention to another tech company (yes, there are others!) that competes in many of the same spaces as Apple.

This week, Google introduced a slew of new devices, from new smartphones to a tablet to a smart home speaker with a screen. And while there will always be those who prefer one company’s products to another, it’s important to have competition in this space in order to drive all companies—including Apple—forward.

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The HomePod’s growing pains


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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Nearly six months into having a HomePod, I made a decision to have it stop listening to me.

If you’re thinking to yourself “Well, that sounds like a fairly central feature of the device?” you’d be right. I now essentially have a very nice but rather expensive AirPlay 2 speaker. But this decision came after a steady and measured observation of how I used Apple’s smart speaker, what it does right, and what it does...less than right.

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MacOS Mojave and the future of the Mac


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Siri Shortcuts: Opening up Siri’s next chapter


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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In 2011, Apple announced that its newest iPhone would incorporate a brand new virtual assistant, based on an app developed by a company that Apple had acquired: Siri. This fall’s release of iOS 12 marks seven years since Siri’s debut, meaning that the virtual assistant would be roughly in first grade by now.

Over the intervening years, Siri has grown in fits and starts, expanding its features and its knowledge base, often with only a little fanfare from Apple. On rare occasions, Apple does devote some attention to the virtual assistant, such as when it produced a whole video dedicated to the relationship between action star—and impossibly cheerful human—Dwayne Johnson and the intelligent agent. But more often than not, Siri’s presented as a facet of Apple’s other products.

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The iPhone Xs: An innovation dilemma


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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In a financial conference call during the last year, Apple CEO Tim Cook described the iPhone X as setting up the next ten years of smartphones. It’s easy to see now what Cook meant by that: this week, the company updated all of its new iPhones to follow the design example set by the iPhone X.

But even as it unveiled the iPhone Xs Max and the iPhone XR, the company ran into a struggle when it came to the iPhone X’s successor, the iPhone Xs. How do you take what was formerly your most advanced iPhone and distinguish it from the rest of your now equally advanced line-up?

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What <em>not</em> to look for at the Sept. 12 Apple event


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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In the week before an Apple event, all is possibility. Could the company announce a new iPhone? Sure. What about a new Apple Watch? Seems likely. New Macs? Perhaps! What about a brand new version of the HomePod with built-in AirPort router capabilities? Ehhhhh, probably not.

Plenty of folks have already run down the announcements they expect to see next week, but let’s instead take this opportunity to highlight some things that Apple is reportedly working on but which probably won’t show up on stage. (And I’m not talking about far off products, like Augmented Reality headsets, the Apple Car, or the coming-in-2019 Mac Pro.) After all, there’s only so much the company can pack into a two-ish hour event: you’ve got to cut it off somewhere.

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Reading the tea leaves: Technologies Apple might be interested in


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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It’s a good thing I’m a tea drinker, because we here in the Apple pundit business spend an awful lot of time trying to read the company’s tea leaves. At best, we can glean only the slightest of indications of what Apple might have in store; the company rarely makes public-facing moves, preferring to keep its cards close to its chest. 

In recent months, however, the company’s actually done a few things that could hint at some of its areas of interest over the next few years. Let’s take a quick look at those decisions and what they might mean for the future of Apple’s product lines—both the ones it has today, as well as the ones it might have tomorrow.

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