For Apple, this year’s Global Accessibility Awareness Day is all about education

Following Apple’s education event in Chicago in March, I wrote about what the company’s announcements might mean for accessibility. After sitting in the audience covering the event, the big takeaway I had was Apple could “make serious inroads in furthering special education as well.” As I wrote, despite how well-designed the Classroom and Schoolwork apps seemingly are, Apple should do more to tailor their new tools to better serve students and educators in special education settings. After all, accessibility and special education are inextricably tied.

It turns out, Apple has, unsurprisingly, considered this.

“In many ways, education and accessibility beautifully overlap,” Sarah Herrlinger, Apple’s Senior Director of Global Accessibility Policy and

Continue reading "For Apple, this year’s Global Accessibility Awareness Day is all about education"

What Apple’s education announcements mean for accessibility

From an accessibility news standpoint, this week’s Apple event in Chicago was antithetical to the October 2016 event. At the latter event, Apple began the presentation with a bang — showing the actual video being edited using Switch Control in Final Cut. Tim Cook came out afterwards to talk some about Apple’s commitment to serving the disabled community before unveiling the then-new accessibility page on the company’s website.

By contrast, the education-themed event in Chicago this week went by with barely a mention of accessibility. The only specific call-out came during Greg Joswiak’s time on stage talking about iPad, when he said “accessibility features make iPad a learning tool Continue reading "What Apple’s education announcements mean for accessibility"

Mobile gaming is having a moment, and Apple has the reins

It’s moved beyond tradition and into the realm of meme that Apple manages to dominate the news cycle around major industry events, all while not actually participating in said events. CES rolls around and every story is about HomeKit or its competitors; another tech giant has a conference and the news is that Apple updated some random subsystem of its ever-larger ecosystem of devices and software .

This is, undoubtedly, planned by Apple in many instances. And why not? Why shouldn’t it own the cycle when it can — it’s only strategically sound.

This week, the 2018 Game Developers Conference is going on and there’s a bunch of news coverage about various aspects of the show. There are all of the pre-written embargo bits about big titles and high-profile indies, there are the trend pieces and, of course, there’s the traditional ennui-laden “who is this event even for” post that accompanies

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Which tablet should you get? We compare the iPad, Fire HD, Kindle, and Galaxy Tab devices

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Like the smart home hub market or robot vacuum market, the tablet market has no chill. The lineup is becoming overwhelmingly saturated with brands like Apple, Amazon, and Samsung trying to prove that their tablet is the best (and more than just an oversized smartphone). 

And when you're shopping for a new tablet (or looking to get one for the first time), it can be a challenge to compare features, screen size, apps, battery life, and more simply by jumping around from website to website.

Lucky for you, we've already done that.

Most tablets have the same basic touchscreens, game playing, and video watching features, etc., and it's seriously hard to tell at first glance what the differences are. Like anything else, which tablet you should get depends on, well, what you want it for.  Read more...

More about Ipad, Samsung, Tablets, Kindle, and App Store

Is Apple’s App Store a monopoly?

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Is Apple's App Store a mall or the equivalent of a sole proprietor shop selling unique wares? That question appears to be at the heart of a now revived lawsuit against Apple, Pepper et al v. Apple Inc. In it, a group of plaintiffs claim that Apple's insistence on selling all iPhone apps through the App Store and not allowing developers to sell iOS apps through other channels, like third-party app stores or directly from the developers themselves, is anti-competitive and artificially inflating prices.

The lawsuit is almost five years old and, according to sources, was dismissed so early on in the legal process that the decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals, which agrees with the plaintiffs, is still a procedural one. It only leaves the door open for the lawsuit to again move forward, without positioning it Continue reading "Is Apple’s App Store a monopoly?"

India’s largest mobile wallet app disappears from the App Store

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With new users comes new responsibilities. India’s largest mobile wallet app is quickly realising this in both good and hard ways.  Paytm has delisted its iPhone and iPad apps on the Apple’s App Store after stumbling across bugs and other technical issues. The company says it has pushed an update for the app and is waiting for Apple to approve it.  The disappearance of Paytm app from the App Store comes hours after the service suffered from an outage Tuesday evening. The service was triggering issues for several users even today.  Read more... More about App Store, Ipad, Iphone, India, and Paytm

Bogus apps are targeting holiday shoppers on the iOS App Store

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Holiday shopping? There's an app for that — but you'll want to make sure you're using the right one to avoid compromising your identity and credit card information. Malicious apps designed to trick shoppers have wormed their way into Apple's iOS App Store, according to recent reports in The New York Times and New York Post. They mimic legitimate outlets like Foot Locker and Nordstrom to fool people into handing over their personal information.

Some are even ransomware, the Times reported, meaning apps that actually lock a user out of their phone until they pay a fee. Read more... More about Ipad, Iphone, App Store, Ios, and Apple

Instagram Makes It Easier To Share From Boomerang

3648565639_38f500d564_b Right before the holidays, Instagram snuck in an update for its most second-most popular spun-out app, Boomerang. The app currently sits in the top 250 on the App Store’s free apps. The changes, although subtle, will probably make its users super happy. The premise of the app is to make little clipped-together videos, similar to an animated GIF or an Apple Live Photo. It feeds into… Read More

At Apple, Macs Pull In More Revenue Than iPads

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The demise of the computer is still nowhere to be seen. In fact, at Apple’s latest earnings call Monday, the company revealed that it pulled in $58 billion in total revenue in its January-March quarter, $5.6 billion of which came from Mac products. Meanwhile, the iPad accounted for $5.43 billion. Then again, that’s no huge accomplishment, given the iPad’s decline for more than a year now. Year over year, iPad sales have stumbled quite a bit. The latest figures peg 12.6 million tablets shipped, down from 16.35 million iPads a year earlier. 
See also: Apple iPad Sales Continue To Tank, Though The iPhone Is Doing Great
The biggest winners in the revenue game, however, were the usual suspects: the iPhone, which brought in a whopping 69 percent of total revenue, and Apple’s services—including iTunes, the App Store, iCloud, and others—which accounted for just under $5
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When Should You Launch Your iOS App? Aim For The Weekend

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All developers want to see their mobile apps take off. But it’s what happens after all the hard work, testing and final prep—and when—that can make or break their chances of success. Especially when it comes to launching and promoting those apps. 
See also: iOS Apps Generated More Revenue Than Hollywood Movies Last Year
Timing is everything, according to app marketing and optimization firm Sensor Tower. Its new report on iOS apps, released Friday, suggests that weekends are the best time to plug those apps, in general. In most categories, that’s when people use them, make purchases and download new ones the most.  But not all apps and target audiences are the same, and results can vary from one type of app to another.

When We Buy, When We Download, And Why


Knowing when people are most likely to buy or download apps, and reaching them in
Continue reading "When Should You Launch Your iOS App? Aim For The Weekend"

iOS games are about to get bigger and (hopefully) better

Not many apps hit iTunes' 2GB file limit, but those that do tend to fall into a certain category (cough games). As a result, developers often must sacrifice graphics quality and effects for iOS titles, the exact problem we pointed out with the recent BioShock iOS release. But Apple has finally lifted that limit, and the max file size on iTunes titles is now 4GB, according to its developer site. That should result in better games, with a caveat. If you decided that $949 was a tad too much to pay on the 128GB iPhone 6 Plus and went for much cheaper 16GB iPhone 6 instead, you may not have enough space for the latest, largest titles. Filed under: , , Comments Via: MacStories Source: Apple

Europeans have two weeks to return iTunes purchases for a refund

Apple has quietly introduced a 14-day return policy for iTunes, App Store, and iBooks purchases in several countries in Europe, according to 9to5Mac. The new policy is apparently in response to a European Commission recommendation. Previously, to receive a refund, you would have to contact Apple support and provide a reason. That’s still the way it works in the United States. But for Europeans, there’s now an automated refund process through Apple’s “Report a Problem” feature. Google recently extended the Google Play app refund window to two hours, even in the United States.
<a href="https://gigaom.com/2014/12/29/europeans-have-two-weeks-to-return-itunes-purchases-for-a-refund/?utm_source=feed&#038;utm_medium=feed&%23038;utm_campaign=feed">Europeans have two weeks to return iTunes purchases for a refund</a> originally published by <a href="https://gigaom.com/">Gigaom</a>, &copy; copyright 2014.



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Europeans have two weeks to return iTunes purchases for a refund

Apple has quietly introduced a 14-day return policy for iTunes, App Store, and iBooks purchases in several countries in Europe, according to 9to5Mac. The new policy is apparently in response to a European Commission recommendation. Previously, to receive a refund, you would have to contact Apple support and provide a reason. That’s still the way it works in the United States. But for Europeans, there’s now an automated refund process through Apple’s “Report a Problem” feature. Google recently extended the Google Play app refund window to two hours, even in the United States.
<a href="http://gigaom.com/2014/12/29/europeans-have-two-weeks-to-return-itunes-purchases-for-a-refund/?utm_source=feed&#038;utm_medium=feed&%23038;utm_campaign=feed">Europeans have two weeks to return iTunes purchases for a refund</a> originally published by <a href="http://gigaom.com/">Gigaom</a>, &copy; copyright 2014.



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Hide App Store Purchases with a Left Swipe

Hide App Store Purchases with a Left Swipe

If you've set up family sharing on your iOS device, you're sharing all your purchasing history with your family. But maybe you don't want to flick through your kid's 50 freemium game downloads just to get to your list of apps. Thankfully, AppleInsider shows how to hide purchases.

Read more...

Mix by FiftyThree makes Paper collaborative

Mix by FiftyThree

Mix by FiftyThree expands on the popular, award-winning drawing app Paper by making it collaborative. Now you can sketch, paint, draw and work on a project with a co-worker or friend, with Mix pushing updates to participating devices. And the best part of all is you needn't be an accomplished artist to benefit. Here's a look at Mix. FiftyThree calls Mix "a visual conversation," and that's an apt description. It's build right into Paper so it's easy to use.

Looks

As you might expect, Mix is great-looking. Projects in your stream flow past a lovely gradient background as you swipe, much like moving past notebooks in Paper. A simple pinch lets you view items within a collection, like your full stream or images you've starred as a favorite. If you can swipe and pinch-to-zoom, you can navigate Mix.

Use

Start with a project on Paper or jump right into "the mix" (sorry, couldn't resist). After launching Paper, you'll see the familiar collection of notebooks. To access Mix, swipe down to push the notebooks away and reveal Mix's interface. Now there's a new row of projects to explore, starting with any you've shared, either from Paper or those you've found and edited while exploring. I'm following several creators, and each is represented by a thumbnail. When I tap that image, I can zoom in on a particular project. The resulting screen shows the original creator's name, the date the project was uploaded, how many "hearts" it has earned (hearts are favorites) and an option to mark it as a favorite myself. But the real fun is browsing the remixes. Swipe across the image to see the next version of it in the "pile." Each variation lists the creator's name as well as who inspired that particular iteration of the image. You can add to anyone of those images yourself by tapping the image to go full screen, and then tapping again to bring up the tools. If you like the changes you've made, confirm them and a new version is added to the pile for others to view and remix. And hey, you say you've got on iPad? No problem! You can access Mix with a browser at mix.fiftythree.com. Use the responsive web app to monitor your stream and mark favorites.

Conclusion

The whole thing is a lot of fun and is clearly the next logical step for Paper. It's just as satisfying to use casually or with professional colleagues. It's one thing to have a digital art studio in your pocket, and quite another to share its contents with collaborators so easily. Mix is that digital art studio.

Mix by FiftyThree makes Paper collaborative originally appeared on TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004Mix by FiftyThree makes Paper collaborative originally appeared on TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Tom Hanks’ Hanx Writer typewriter app is a surprisingly fun writing tool

Celebrities throwing their names behind products are nothing new. Ronald Reagan hawked cigarettes, Kim Kardashian has her own mobile game, even the Simpsons made the jump. Still there's something odd about Tom Hanks being the driving force of interest in an iPad app. His recently launched Hanx Writer app puts a futuristic typewriter on the screen of your iPad, and it's been a hit on the charts since its release. To a degree, my interest in the app is specifically because of Hanks' everyman modern Jimmy Stewart persona. After years of pop culture, for some reason, Tom Hanks is someone I instinctively trust. Apparently, this is my Kardashian app. Thankfully Hanx Writer is worth giving a test run, even if you never thought you'd enjoy playing on an typewriter. The free version of the app gives you one typewriter to play with. It provides a nice clean piece of paper, an automatic slide, and the distinctive click-clack you would expect from a typewriter. Modern conveniences like spellcheck, copy/paste, and replace are all at your finger tips. The app even allows you to export your documents. Basically this is a fancy word processing tool, free of distractions beyond the hypnotizing click of the keys. When you're done you can read your work on a screen that looks like type on a fresh piece of paper. It's a beautiful, crisp interface. Hanx Writer's onscreen keyboard is fast and responsive, though the ideal experience comes when you pair it with a Bluetooth keyboard. If you're just looking for a writing tool that simulates the joys of using a typewriter, the free version is fun enough. You can buy additional typewriters for $2.99 apiece, or buy the "Writer's Block Bundle" which comes with both additional models and extra features.

These extra features add the ability to align text on the page, add a title page and picture, change ribbon and the app's background colors, and manage multiple documents. Writing on a typewriter can be incredibly soothing and mixing its subtle aesthetic charms, both visual and aural, into a proper mini word processor with the Writer's Block Bundle will be an appealing proposition to many users. For me, however, the free version is just fine. Part of the charm of using a typewriter is the simplicity of it, and if I need to manage documents I don't mind cutting and pasting text. There's something about the sound of a typewriter that makes free writing easier. It becomes less an exercise in writing something brilliant, and more a race to see how long you can keep the click-clack going before you run out of steam. Many writers still enjoy using typewriters today because they lack the distractions of modern computers. You don't get that freedom when using Hanx Writer on your iPad unless you put your device in airplane mode first to get a little peace. It adds to the Hanx Writer experience when you use it like an actual typewriter. Some may write off these charms as simple nostalgia, but unless you've ever played with a typewriter you can't really judge for sure. Hanx Writer is a solid app that's worth trying for free, and you may find yourself wanting to throw down the extra money for the full featured version.

Tom Hanks' Hanx Writer typewriter app is a surprisingly fun writing tool originally appeared on TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004Tom Hanks' Hanx Writer typewriter app is a surprisingly fun writing tool originally appeared on TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Tue, 19 Aug 2014 17:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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