Gmail’s cleaner, brighter mobile app rolls out to everyone this week


This post is by Engadget RSS Feed from Engadget RSS Feed


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you notice that Gmail suddenly looks different on your phone, you're not the only one. Google has confirmed to Engadget that its email client's Material Design makeover is available to all Android users now, and should reach all iOS users by the end of the week. As we mentioned back in January, this is mostly about dragging Gmail's aesthetic into the modern era. The familiar red title bar is gone in favor of a full-length search bar with a more accessible account switcher, while the overall look is brighter and more spacious. You'll see Google's latest in-house font everywhere, for that matter.

Via: The Verge

Source: Google Play

Google sat on a Chromecast bug for years, now hackers could wreak havoc


This post is by Zack Whittaker from iPad – TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Google was warned of a bug in its Chromecast media streaming stick years ago, but did not fix it. Now, hackers are exploiting the bug — and security researchers say things could get even worse.

A hacker, known as Hacker Giraffe, has become the latest person to figure out how to trick Google’s media streamer into playing any YouTube video they want — including videos that are custom-made. This time around, the hacker hijacked thousands of Chromecasts, forcing them to display a pop-up notice that’s viewable on the connected TV, warning the user that their misconfigured router is exposing their Chromecast and smart TV to hackers like himself.

Not one to waste an opportunity, the hacker also asks that you subscribe to PewDiePie, an awful internet person with a popular YouTube following. (He’s the same hacker who tricked thousands of exposed printers into printing support for PewDiePie.)

The

Continue reading "Google sat on a Chromecast bug for years, now hackers could wreak havoc"

Google adds Lens to its iOS search app


This post is by Engadget RSS Feed from Engadget RSS Feed


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




You no longer have to fire up Google Photos if you want to use Lens searches on your iPhone. Google has rolled the AI-based feature into its iOS search app, putting it in a more logical place than your image library. Tap the Lens icon in the search bar and you can point your device camera at books, bottles, pets and various other objects to get more answers about what you see. You can tell Lens to look at your existing images or turn on the flash when it's too dark.

Via: 9to5Google

Source: App Store, Google (Twitter)

Bright spots in the VR market


This post is by Jonathan Shieber from iPad – TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Virtual reality is in a public relations slump. Two years ago the public’s expectations for virtual reality’s potential was at its peak. Many believed (and still continue to believe) that VR would transform the way we connect, interact and communicate in our personal and professional lives.

Google Trends highlighting search trends related to virtual reality over time; the “Note” refers to an improvement in Google’s data collection system that occurred in early 2016

It’s easy to understand why this excitement exists once you put on a head-mounted display. While there are still a limited number of compelling experiences, after you test some of the early successes in the field, it’s hard not to extrapolate beyond the current state of affairs to a magnificent future

Continue reading "Bright spots in the VR market"

Apple ditches the headphone jack on latest iPad Pro models


This post is by Matt Burns from iPad – TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The headphone jack is missing from the latest versions of the iPad Pro. It’s gone. Dead. Worse yet, the headphones that come with the iPhone will not work either. Apple ditched Lightning for USB-C. Instead, Apple is selling a USB-C to 3.5mm dongle for $9.

The latest iPad Pro models follows the trend lines set by the iPhone. Just like on the iPhone, the Home Button is missing, and the headphone jack is gone. It’s a concession some users might find surprising. On the iPhone, there’s obviously less real estate to integrate a large port but that’s, in theory, less of an issue in a large device like a tablet. But it makes sense. Apple tends to maximize margins by ensuring different products use a similar set of hardware. And since the iPhone hasn’t had a headphone port since 2016, it’s about time the trend hits Apple’s other mobile

Apple Fall Event 2018
Continue reading "Apple ditches the headphone jack on latest iPad Pro models"

Review: Apple’s iPhone XR is a fine young cannibal


This post is by Matthew Panzarino from iPad – TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




This iPhone is great. It is most like the last iPhone — but not the last “best” iPhone — more like the last not as good iPhone. It’s better than that one though, just not as good as the newest best iPhone or the older best iPhone.

If you’re upgrading from an iPhone 7 or iPhone 8, you’re gonna love it and likely won’t miss any current features while also getting a nice update to a gesture-driven phone with Face ID. But don’t buy it if you’re coming from an iPhone X, you’ll be disappointed as there are some compromises from the incredibly high level of performance and quality in Apple’s last flagship, which really was pushing the envelope at the time.

From a consumer perspective, this is offering a bit of choice that targets the same kind of customer who bought the iPhone 8 instead of the iPhone X

Continue reading "Review: Apple’s iPhone XR is a fine young cannibal"

Google’s latest hardware innovation: Price


This post is by Matt Burns from iPad – TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




With its latest consumer hardware products, Google’s prices are undercutting Apple, Samsung, and Amazon. The search giant just unveiled its latest flagship smartphone, tablet, and smart home device and all available at prices well below their direct competitors. Where Apple and Samsung are pushing prices of its latest products even higher, Google is seemingly happy to keep prices low and this is creating a distinct advantage for the company’s products.

Google, like Amazon and nearly Apple, is a services company that happens to sell hardware. It needs to acquire users through multiple verticals including hardware. Somewhere, deep in the Googleplex, a team of number crunchers decided it made more sense to make its hardware prices dramatically lower than competitors. If Google is taking a loss on the hardware, it is likely making it back through services.

Amazon does this with Kindle devices. Microsoft and Sony do it with game consoles.

more Google Event 2018 coverage
Continue reading "Google’s latest hardware innovation: Price"

Waze navigation is now available on Apple CarPlay


This post is by Engadget RSS Feed from Engadget RSS Feed


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you're an iPhone owner in need of driving directions, you've probably had one thing on your mind since June: when will that version of Waze with CarPlay support show up? Thankfully, you don't have to wait any more -- it's here. Hot on the heels of a corresponding Google Maps upgrade, the Waze app can take advantage of your car's touchscreen to provide its crowdsourced approach to navigation. The experience will likely be familiar if you've used the Android Auto equivalent.

Source: App Store

Happy 10th anniversary, Android


This post is by Devin Coldewey from iPad – TechCrunch


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It’s been 10 years since Google took the wraps off the G1, the first Android phone. Since that time the OS has grown from buggy, nerdy iPhone alternative to arguably the most popular (or at least populous) computing platform in the world. But it sure as heck didn’t get there without hitting a few bumps along the road.

Join us for a brief retrospective on the last decade of Android devices: the good, the bad, and the Nexus Q.

HTC G1 (2008)

This is the one that started it all, and I have a soft spot in my heart for the old thing. Also known as the HTC Dream — this was back when we had an HTC, you see — the G1 was about as inauspicious a debut as you can imagine. Its full keyboard, trackball, slightly janky slide-up screen (crooked even in official photos), and considerable

Continue reading "Happy 10th anniversary, Android"

Square finally has a Lightning card reader for newer iPhones


This post is by Engadget RSS Feed from Engadget RSS Feed


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




If you have a newer iPhone, it's been a pain to take payments from magstripe cards using a Square reader -- without a native headphone jack, you've had to plug in a dongle and hold it steady while you serve a customer. Isn't Square overdue for a more iPhone-friendly version? Thankfully, it's here. You now have the option of a magstripe reader with a Lightning connection instead of the usual 3.5mm plug. There's nothing new apart from the port compatibility, but the identical $10 price makes it an easy choice if you run an iPhone-centric shop.

Source: Square