iOS 11.1 brings new emojis and important security updates

Apple has released iOS 11.1 and it comes with over 70 new emojis, the return of 3D Touch multitasking and a handful of bug fixes. Some of the new emojis include a cursing smiley face, a vampire, a hedgehog, Chinese takeout, a sandwich and a mermaid. Some existing emojis have been tweaked to improve their design as well. Once you update your OS, the new selections will appear in your keyboard, and if someone sends you one of the new emojis, they won't show up properly on your phone until you've updated.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Apple

Apple’s iTunes update removes the desktop iOS app store

While Apple expanded its iPhone lineup today, a software update delivered for iTunes on Windows and Mac PCs is slimming things down a bit. Once users install version 12.7 they will no longer have access to the App Store from the desktop. As described on Apple's support page, a focus toward "music, movies, TV shows, podcasts, and audiobooks" means that you'll usually need to use your iOS devices to manage the apps installed on them. What it adds in this update is the ability to sync with devices running iOS 11 and social music sharing for Apple Music subscribers.

Via: MacRumors

Source: Apple Support

Apple releases iOS 10.2 and its companion TV app

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/e5f7ce402c20a6d5d4cc50b0c6c26cf9/204696068/s.aolcdn.jpg" />Apple is making good on its promise of giving you a <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/10/27/the-new-apple-tv-app-is-tv/">unified video streaming experience</a>.  The company has released iOS 10.2 and tvOS 10.1, both of which include the company's centerpiece TV app.  So long as a given service supports the feature, you no longer have to jump into and out of apps to catch up on your viewing -- you can resume your favorite show or check out recommendations from a single place.  Netflix isn't included in TV at the moment, alas, but this and the recently launched <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/12/06/apples-tv-single-sign-on-feature-goes-live-in-the-us/">single sign-on</a> should save you a lot of hassle.
                                                <strong>Source: </strong><a  href="http://www.macrumors.com/2016/12/12/apple-releases-ios-10-2/">MacRumors</a><!--//-->

iOS update fixes your iPhone’s missing Health data

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/GLOB/crop/5184x3456+0+0/resize/1600x1067!/format/jpg/quality/85/http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/f40b54d1b85a2422ca7f379f71e8640e/200749831/cb7b5d1ef7224aeda1c69c60a208a532.jpeg" />The <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/10/24/apple-releases-ios-10-1-adds-portrait-mode-to-the-iphone-7-plus/">iOS 10.1 update</a> addressed a lot of initial gripes with Apple's <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/16/ios-10-review/">latest mobile operating system</a>. However, it also introduced a glaring bug for some users: the Health app might not show your data, which is more than a little troublesome if you're a fitness maven or need those stats for <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/03/21/apples-carekit-will-help-patients-better-manage-their-illnesses/">medical reasons</a>. Don't fret, though. Apple has released an iOS 10.1.1 update for the iPad, iPhone and iPod touch that makes sure you can see Health info. This is a relatively tiny update (the over-the-air fix is well under 100MB for many iPhone users), but it'll matter a lot if you're tracking step counts or calories with your Apple gear.
                                    <strong>Via: </strong><a  href="https://9to5mac.com/2016/10/31/apple-releases-ios-10-1-1-for-iphone-and-ipad-fixes-bug-with-missing-health-data/">9to5Mac</a><!--//-->
                                    <strong>Source: </strong><a  href="https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1893?viewlocale=en_US&amp;locale=en_US">Apple</a><!--//-->

iOS 10 review: Apple evolves

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/88823dc2a614467838e42f7fb4c1c0ee/204337110/iOS%2B10%2Breview%2Bgallery%2B1-ed.jpg" />With <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/07/ios-10-public-beta-preview/">iOS 10</a>, Apple is basically polishing a pearl. iOS 8 introduced a vibrant and "flat" new aesthetic. iOS 9 was focused on refinement. So by this point, we should get something completely fresh and new, right? Well, not quite. Just like the <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/13/iphone-7-and-7-plus-review/">iPhone 7</a>, Apple's latest mobile OS doesn't look <em>that</em> much different on the surface. Instead, the company once again chose to focus on improving the overall experience. In particular, this year's refinements collectively make the OS a lot more convenient (and help Apple play a little catch-up). If you've longed for some of the features you've seen on your friends' Android phones, iOS 10 is more than enough to keep you under Apple's spell for another year.

Apple releases iOS 10 and watchOS 3

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/d96044b9a4a1136634298fa12ef0f94b/204321948/s.aolcdn.jpg" />You no longer have to be a guinea pig to give Apple's latest software upgrades a try -- <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/07/ios-10-download-september-13/">as promised</a>, the Cupertino crew has released the finished versions of <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/07/ios-10-public-beta-preview/">iOS 10</a> and <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/07/apple-watchos-3-release-date/">watchOS 3</a>.  As before, iOS' biggest improvements are in communication -- Messages gets apps, hand-drawn images, secret messages and stickers (among many other additions), while Siri now offers you control over third-party apps.  You'll also see major interface revamps in Maps (which now offers proactive suggestions) and Music, a Home app to manage smart household gadgets, lock screen widgets and wider use of 3D Touch on supporting hardware.

iOS 10 will be available to download on September 13

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/b5f09879c60db4ef6ed1532000cf8e5b/204294118/ios10-fb2-ed.jpg" />In some countries, Tuesday 13th is the unlucky date (not Friday). Coincidentally, that's the date you'll be able to upgrade your iPhone or iPad to <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/07/ios-10-public-beta-preview/">iOS 10</a>. Version 10 of iOS has been rattling around since Apple's <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/06/13/apples-ios-10-is-all-about-expanded-3d-touch/">developer conference</a> in June, and we've had a pretty good look at most of the new features, but now they're finally ready for prime time.

iOS 10 warns when your Lightning port gets wet

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/ea93f8eeb937b73837d4ebbf86013907/204105889/ios-10-water-warning.jpg" />Many mobile devices are <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2015/10/02/iphone-6s-waterproof/">water-resistant</a> (some <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/09/samsung-galaxy-s7-active-review/">more than others</a>), but they'll rarely tell you when there's a less-than-obvious danger.  You might not find out that you've soaked something important until a gadget doesn't work.  Apple appears to have a solution, though: <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/20/ios-10-and-macos-sierra-public-beta-2/">recent betas</a> for <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/07/ios-10-public-beta-preview/">iOS 10</a> will serve a warning when there's liquid detected in your device's Lightning port.  Ideally, this gives you time to pull an accessory (and dry out your gear) before there's any real damage.
                                                <strong>Source: </strong><a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/iOSBeta/comments/4tgobi/feature_ios_10_now_warns_you_when_you_might_be_at/" >Reddit (1)</a><!--//-->, <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/iOS10/comments/4tt620/has_anyone_else_seen_the_liquid_detected_warning/" >(2)</a><!--//-->, <a href="https://youtu.be/nd868K2zIMY?t=1m6s" >EverythingApplePro (YouTube)</a><!--//-->

Apple releases second public betas for iOS 10 and macOS Sierra

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/9b371812cafb12e7caa74ac2b810c30e/204059649/ios10-fb2-ed.jpg" />Were you quick to hop on the test versions of <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/07/07/ios-10-public-beta-preview/">iOS 10</a> and <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/06/22/apple-macos-sierra-hands-on/">macOS Sierra</a>?  It's time to start updating.  Apple has <a href="https://beta.apple.com/sp/betaprogram/">released</a> the second public betas of both platforms, and they're not just adding some spit and polish.  The new iOS 10 beta introduces a functioning option for using Touch ID to unlock your device the "old-fashioned" iOS 9 way, where resting your finger is enough to get to your home screen.  If you lock an <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2015/10/01/iphone-6s-and-6s-plus-review/">iPhone 6s or 6s Plus</a>, you'll get vibration feedback.  And if you're a health maven, you can opt to share your activity and workout data to help improve Apple's fitness features.
                                    <strong>Via: </strong><a href="http://www.macrumors.com/2016/07/20/apple-releases-ios-10-public-beta-2/" >MacRumors (1)</a><!--//-->, <a href="http://www.macrumors.com/2016/07/20/apple-releases-macos-sierra-public-beta-2/" >(2)</a><!--//-->
                                    <strong>Source: </strong><a href="https://beta.apple.com/sp/betaprogram/" >Apple</a><!--//-->

iOS 9.2 gives you more control over Apple Music and iBooks

        <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/2726cfc14ac3a097b3c424426d1a377e/203100566/iphone-6s-icons-will-lipman.jpg" />Apple is clearly hoping to clear its slate before the year is over.  On top of that <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/12/08/apple-smart-battery-case-iphone-review/">iPhone battery case</a>, it just posted an iOS 9.2 update that brings big improvements to <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/06/30/a-closer-look-at-apple-music/">Apple Music</a> and iBooks.  For a start, it's much easier to reconcile your iCloud Music Library with the streaming service -- you can see whether or not any song has been downloaded, and quickly download whole albums or playlists.  It's easier to start a new playlist or add a song to a recent list, too.  iBooks, meanwhile, supports both <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/10/01/iphone-6s-and-6s-plus-review/">3D Touch</a> (for peeking at pages) and background audiobook listening while you browse books inside the app.
                        <strong>Via: </strong><a href="http://www.macrumors.com/2015/12/08/apple-releases-ios-9-2/" >MacRumors</a><!--//-->

iOS and OS X updates arrive with a ton of new emoji

        <div style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/10/21/os-x-10-11-1-and-ios-9-1/"><img alt="Some of the new emoji in iOS 9.1 and OS X 10.11.1" data-credit="Emojipedia / Apple" data-mep="1013508" src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/e087058919006869aff4a408d2afc29c/202840212/ios-9-1-emoji.jpg" /></a></div>
If you've ever wanted to text taco pics from your iPhone or give the middle finger from your Mac, today's your lucky day. Apple has released iOS 9.1 and OS X El Capitan 10.11.1, both of which add a slew of new Unicode emoji ranging from Mexican food through to rude gestures. There are some important under-the-hood fixes, too. Your iPhone 6s or 6s Plus is now smart enough to stop recording Live Photos when you lower the device, and OS X shouldn't run into trouble with Office 2016. Whichever platform you're using, you'll likely want to update pronto -- if just to see the cutesy characters you'd otherwise miss. [Image credit: Emojipedia] Source: MacRumors (1), (2)

Apple fixes an iOS 9 bug that kept you from upgrading

        <div style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/09/23/apple-releases-ios-9-0-1-update/"><img alt="iOS 9 on an iPhone and iPad" data-credit="AOL" data-mep="972277" src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/aba285e870419d2452ac7ae9af4e20e8/202692113/ios-9-1200.jpg" /></a></div>
The launch of iOS 9 was supposed to be a joyous occasion if you own an iPad, iPhone or iPod touch, but it didn't always work out that way. A bug left some stuck on the "slide to upgrade" screen, preventing them from using their gear unless they rolled back to iOS 8 or started fresh. If you're one of those glitch victims, you'll be glad to hear that relief is in sight: Apple has released an iOS 9.0.1 update that (you guessed it) makes sure you get past that upgrade screen. It also tackles a few other hiccups that could sour your initial experience, including one that prevented some alarms and timers from playing. As such, you'll probably want to check for the update right away. And if it's too late to avoid the worst, Apple's support site (linked above) has a guide to getting your device Continue reading "Apple fixes an iOS 9 bug that kept you from upgrading"

iOS 9 is already running on more than half of Apple mobile devices

        <div style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/09/21/ios-9-rapid-adoption-rate/"><img alt="Apple's iPhone 6s" src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/b4d63b738d4462228ef4daaec15f200d/202607748/iphone6s.jpg" /></a></div>
Apple may have taken a long while to get users upgrading to iOS 8, but it isn't having any such trouble with iOS 9. The iPhone maker has revealed that more than half of all iOS devices are already running the new software less than a week after it launched. That's the fastest adoption rate yet for the platform, if you ask the folks in Cupertino. That's certainly better than on Android, where just 21 percent of users are running Lollipop, but it's not really that surprising when you realize that Apple has bent over backwards to put iOS 9 on as many devices as possible. Source: Apple

Apple nixes Monster’s licensing over Beats lawsuit

Apple Said To Be In Talks To Purchase Beats Headphones Company

Monster's lawsuit against Beats Electronics last January has come back to bite it now that Beats is an Apple subsidiary. The Wall Street Journal reports that Apple has killed Monster's official licensing agreement deader than that reported Beats WiFi speaker. Monster has been producing licensed accessories (lightning cables, headphones and whatnot) since 2005. Plus, it's reportedly paid more than $12 million in licensing fees since 2008 for the honor of selling "Made for iPhone/iPod/iPad" devices, some of which retailed in Apple stores. Filed under: Comments Source: Wall Street Journal

Apple’s iOS 8.3 update brings wireless CarPlay to your iPhone

CarPlay on a Ferrari
Apple's busy today -- on top of finally releasing Photos, it's rolling out the long-expected iOS 8.3 update. It's not as huge as 8.2 was, but you'll likely appreciate it if you're a tech-savvy driver. The upgrade brings wireless CarPlay in supporting vehicles, so you don't have to plug in your iPhone just to get directions or music on your car's center display. You'll also find more diverse emoji (as in OS X), the option to download free apps without a password and a much easier way of signing into Google accounts when you use two-factor authentication. There's a whole bunch of app performance and interface fixes on top of this, so you'll definitely want to grab the 8.3 patch when you get the chance. Filed under: , , Comments Source: 9to5Mac

Here’s how accessories will use your iPhone’s Lightning port

The Lightning port on an iPhone 6 Plus
Apple already lets accessory makers use the Lightning port on iOS devices for headphones. However, it's reportedly close to opening the floodgates to more devices... and if 9to5Mac's leaked specs are accurate, the company will let these peripherals do more that you might expect. Lightning lets the iPhone send power and data to everything from game controllers to speakers, but it should also let you pass through other accessories at the same time. A dock could charge and sync your iPhone while you listen to music without needing a mess of extra cables, for instance. The connector should also charge battery-powered gear faster than the standard USB cables you use today. Filed under: , , , , Comments Source: 9to5Mac

Apple’s iOS 8 is now available for you to download

Apple's iOS 8 may not look too different from the version that preceded it, but trust us: there are plenty of new bits and bobs to get familiar with once you start poking around. Now that you've had some time to dig into our full review, you can take iOS 8 for a spin yourself -- Apple has just pushed the update live, so check your iDevice's settings to see if it's your time to shine. Just keep a few things in mind before you enter the breach: the update will only install on the iPhone 4S and newer, the iPad 2 and newer and the 5th generation iPod Touch. Oh, and it looks like Apple is having some HealthKit trouble at the moment, so all HealthKit compatible apps have been temporarily removed from the App Store. According to tweets from Carrot Fit developer Brian Mueller, Apple has been saying that a fix is in the works but there's no ETA on when it'll actually take effect. Nothing like a few hiccups to kick off a massive software launch, no?
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Apple reveals iOS 8 at WWDC, available for free this fall

We all knew it was coming, and now it's here. Apple CEO Tim Cook just put months of breathless speculation to rest by pulling back the curtain on iOS 8 during the company's WWDC 2014 keynote address in San Francisco. It doesn't look like the sort of quantum leap that iOS 7 was, but Apple's head honcho assures us that it interacts in some fantastic ways with the new version of OS X and that it pairs great end user features with great developer features. Well, we'll be the judges of that. The big keynote just wrapped up -- here's what we know and what it means for you. First things first. There's a lot to dig into, but you'll get iOS 8 as a free update sometime this fall for the iPhone 4s and newer, the fifth-gen iPod touch and the iPad 2 and newer. If you're a developer though, you'll be able to access the iOS 8 beta and SDK today. %Gallery-slideshow197980%
Filed under: Comments

iRing adds gesture-control capability to iOS music apps (video)

This year's CES has introduced us to a number of devices that cater to specific people. That includes IK Multimedia's iRing accessory, designed for aspiring DJs who'd like to control their iOS music apps with gestures... and a dash of showmanship. So long as a user's wearing the iRing, the iDevice's front camera picks the gesture controls up, and the peripheral's accompanying app translates them to commands music software can understand. According to the company (the same one responsible for a few other music accessories for iOS), the iRing's capable of controlling not only basic music apps, but also advanced ones designed for those who mix their own tunes. It also comes with a couple of its own music-editing apps that one can use to add effects and create non-stop loops. Those who prefer waving their hands in the air over poking at on-screen controls can get the iRing in various music and electronic retailers worldwide for $25.%Gallery-slideshow160166%

Update: We've just gone hands-on with the iRing at CES and gave it a whirl with iRing Music Maker, one of two apps (the other is FX Controller) that it can take advantage of at launch. The iRing setup consists of two plastic "rings," which have an array of three dots on each side. One end of the plastic peripheral has the specks ordered into a triangle, while the other side has them in a line. An iOS device's camera recognizes the dot formation and controls the mapped function. Push one hand in and out to cycle through music effects or use your other paw to vary intensity. It works as promised, but we wouldn't consider it terribly useful -- unless, of course, you're a DJ only interested showmanship.

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Source: IK Multimedia

iRing adds gesture control capability to iOS music apps (video)

This year's CES has introduced us to a number of devices that cater to specific people. That includes IK Multimedia's iRing accessory, designed for aspiring DJs who'd like to control their iOS music apps with gestures...and a dash of showmanship. So long as a user's wearing the iRing, the iDevice's front camera picks the gesture controls up, and the peripheral's accompanying app translates them to commands music software can understand. According to the company (the same one responsible for a few other music accessories for iOS), the iRing's capable of controlling not only basic music apps, but also advanced ones designed for those who mix their own tunes. It also comes with a couple of its own music editing apps that one can use to add effects and create non-stop loops. Those who prefer waving their hands in the air over poking at on-screen controls can get the iRing in various music and electronic retailers worldwide for $25.

Filed under: ,

Comments

Source: IK Multimedia