North Carolina elementary teachers will get iPads to bolster reading

Apple's renewed push for iPads in schools appears to be paying dividends. North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction Mark Johnson has unfurled plans to give the state's K-3 teachers iPads to help improve and track student reading. Educators will use the tablets to "reduce burdens" and boost interaction as kids advance their reading levels. Johnson didn't outline the cost per tablet, but the state will pay $6 million out of a $15 million pool of unused money from previous budget years.

Source: WRAL

iOS 12 developer beta points to bezel-less iPad with FaceID

Last year, early iOS leaks gave us a preview of the eventual iPhone X and some details on Apple's HomePod speaker. Now, 9to5Mac points out an icon in the iOS 12 developer beta that seems to show an iPad design with tiny bezels all around and missing the home button. Separately, code for accessibility features shows evidence of FaceID support in an upcoming iPad Pro likely scheduled for release this fall.

The image doesn't show an iPhone X-like notch, so presumably new iPads would manage to squeeze a TrueDepth camera into the remaining bezel. With iPad sales remaining flat compared to last year, it seems likely that we'll see new devices soon, and now we have some idea at least of what they'll look like.

Source: 9to5Mac

iOS 12 developer beta points to bezel-less iPad with FaceID

Last year, early iOS leaks gave us a preview of the eventual iPhone X and some details on Apple's HomePod speaker. Now, 9to5Mac points out an icon in the iOS 12 developer beta that seems to show an iPad design with tiny bezels all around and missing the home button. Separately, code for accessibility features shows evidence of FaceID support in an upcoming iPad Pro likely scheduled for release this fall.

The image doesn't show an iPhone X-like notch, so presumably new iPads would manage to squeeze a TrueDepth camera into the remaining bezel. With iPad sales remaining flat compared to last year, it seems likely that we'll see new devices soon, and now we have some idea at least of what they'll look like.

Source: 9to5Mac

‘PUBG Mobile’ adds fast-paced War Mode and clans

PUBG Mobile just got some spicier gameplay, whether you're just looking for a quick fix or striving for glory. Both Android and iOS versions of the game now include War Mode, which ditches the familiar battle royale in favor of a deathmatch-style experience where respawns are available and kill counts are the key to victory. At the same time, competitive players are getting their fill with clan support (including insignia, missions and a Clan Shop).

Source: App Store, Google Play

The best mobile devices for students

There's no negotiating on this: You need a smartphone at college. Powerful flagships like the iPhone X and the Samsung Galaxy S9 promise speedy performance, but even more affordable options like the Xperia XZ2 Compact and OnePlus 6 offer an impressive amount of bang for your buck. Though not necessary, you might also want a tablet for book-reading, or a smartwatch that double as a fitness tracker. While the Apple Watch is the most obvious choice for an iPhone user, other brands have offerings that are just as stylish -- stuff you won't be ashamed of wearing around campus.

As for tablets, Apple's 9.7-inch iPad doesn't break the bank (at least before you add on accessories) and is now compatible with the Apple Pencil -- a tool once reserved for the higher-end iPad Pro line. Meanwhile, the Microsoft Surface Pro offers laptop-grade power, though we recommend paying extra for Continue reading "The best mobile devices for students"

Google brings accessible Morse code typing to Gboard on iOS

Google is expanding the reach of Gboard's Morse code support. The search firm has introduced the accessibility-focused keyboard to Gboard for iOS, making communication easier for iPhone and iPad owners with limited motion. As before, it replaces the usual letters with giant dot and dash buttons and offers text suggestions that include the Morse code for a given word. If you're not sure how to write, don't worry -- Google is providing some help on that front as well.

Via: 9to5Google, CNET

Source: Google, App Store, Morse Typing Trainer

Apple releases new iPad, FaceID ads

Apple has released a handful of new ads promoting the iPad’s portability and convenience over both laptops and traditional paper solutions. The 15-second ads focus on how the iPad can make even the most tedious things — travel, notes, paperwork, and ‘stuff’ — just a bit easier.

Three out of the four spots show the sixth-generation iPad, which was revealed at Apple’s education event in March, and which offers a lower-cost ($329 in the U.S.) option with Pencil support.

The ads were released on Apple’s international YouTube channels (UAE, Singapore, and United Kingdom).

This follows another 90-second ad released yesterday, focusing on FaceID. The commercial shows a man in a gameshow-type setting asked to remember the banking password he created earlier that morning. He struggles for an excruciating amount of time before realizing he can access the banking app via FaceID.

There has been some Continue reading "Apple releases new iPad, FaceID ads"

iOS 12 code hints at iPad with Face ID

Apple's iOS 12 has hinted from the outset that an iPad with a notched display was in the works (the status bar conspicuously made room for it). If you were wondering whether or not that meant an iPhone X-style TrueDepth camera and Face ID, though, you can rest assured after today. Developer Steve Troughton-Smith has discovered that AvatarKit, the framework behind Animoji and Memoji, now supports the iPad. Given that you need a TrueDepth camera for these face-tracking personas to work, and the iPad Pro hasn't been updated in over a year... well, you do the math.

Via: AppleInsider

Source: Steve Troughton-Smith (Twitter)

Apple is fixing Maps using its own data

Apple Maps has come a long way since the fiasco when it first launched, but there's no question that there's room for improvement. It just isn't as robust as Google Maps, which has the luxury of both a years-long head start and complete control over the mapping process. And Apple knows it. In an interview with TechCrunch, the company's Eddy Cue has revealed plans to revamp Maps using its own data set rather than the current piecemeal approach, which has relied on info from the likes of OpenStreetMap and TomTom. The new technique promises not only greater mp accuracy and detail, but faster updates that take days rather than months.

Source: TechCrunch

Apple is rebuilding Maps from the ground up

I’m not sure if you’re aware, but the launch of Apple Maps went poorly. After a rough first impression, an apology from the CEO, several years of patching holes with data partnerships and some glimmers of light with long-awaited transit directions and improvements in business, parking and place data, Apple Maps is still not where it needs to be to be considered a world-class service.

Maps needs fixing.

Apple, it turns out, is aware of this, so it’s re-building the maps part of Maps.

It’s doing this by using first-party data gathered by iPhones with a privacy-first methodology and its own fleet of cars packed with sensors and cameras. The new product will launch in San Francisco and the Bay Area with the next iOS 12 beta and will cover Northern California by fall.

Every version of iOS will get the updated maps eventually, and they will

Continue reading "Apple is rebuilding Maps from the ground up"

Anchor’s iPad app is an all-in-one podcast studio

Back in February, the audio social network Anchor relaunched as a one-stop podcast-making shop. Now it's introducing an iPad app that's designed for the larger device's touch interface. Best of all, it includes editing tools, enabling users to trim, cut and drop in segments and effects at their whim. Get it now for free in the App Store.

Apple slapped with $6.6M fine in Australia over bricked devices

Apple has been fined AUS$9M (~$6.6M) by a court in Australia following a legal challenge by a consumer rights group related to the company’s response after iOS updates bricked devices that had been repaired by third parties.

The Australian Competitor and Consumer Commission (ACCC) invested a series of complaints relating to an error (‘error 53’) which disabled some iPhones and iPads after owners downloaded an update to Apple’s iOS operating system.

The ACCC says Apple admitted that, between February 2015 and February 2016 — via the Apple US’ website, Apple Australia’s staff in-store and customer service phone calls — it had informed at least 275 Australian customers affected by error 53 that they were no longer eligible for a remedy if their device had been repaired by a third party.

Image credit: 70023venus2009 via Flickr under license CC BY-ND 2.0

The court judged Apple’s action to have breached the Continue reading "Apple slapped with $6.6M fine in Australia over bricked devices"

Valve removes game purchases from Steam Link’s iOS beta

Apple and Valve have been at an impasse for weeks over the release of Steam Link for iOS, but it looks like they might be closer to an arrangement... if not necessarily the one you'd hope for. TouchArcade has discovered that the latest beta test for Steam Link's iOS edition removes purchasing from within the app. If you visit a game's product page, the usual buying options are replaced with a notice that the content is "available for purchase from your PC." You can use any existing funds in your wallet when you're in the Steam Marketplace, but you can't add funds.

Via: MacRumors

Source: TouchArcade

iOS 12 will help you fight your phone addiction

Apple is making good on its promise to fight iPhone addiction. It's introducing a suite of features in iOS 12 that curb the deluge of notifications and alerts that keep you hooked. To start, it's much smarter about how and when it displays notifications. You'll finally, finally see grouped notifications (no more wading through 10 alerts for the same app), for one thing. Do Not Disturb mode can silence all your notifications, too, so you're not tempted to check updates if you wake up in the middle of the night. You can also quickly manage notifications for an app, including an option to "deliver quietly" so that your device won't ping you every single time.