The iRig Keys I/O makes it easy to streamline your studio

Whether you're demoing a song for your band or recording a masterpiece to share on Soundcloud, you'll likely need a couple of things to connect to your computer. If you're planning on having any real instruments or vocals, you'll need some sort of audio interface to turn your analog sounds into digital ones. I have an M-Audio MobilePre USB for that task, which runs about $180 on Amazon. In addition, you probably want to have a MIDI controller, to "play" all those sounds you don't have real instruments for. These can typically cost $250 - $500 or so, depending on features. At $300, IK Multimedia's iRig Keys I/O 49 comes in at the lower end of this bracket.

Ripplemaker brings modular synths to all skill levels with an iOS app

There are plenty of apps that can turn your phone or tablet into a synthesizer, but they tend to fall into two camps: they're either affordable and simple or pricey and robust. While that's sometimes due to the nature of the instruments they're replicating, it can frustrating if you want an app that covers all the bases. However, music app developer Bram Bos may have managed just that. He recently released Ripplemaker, a patch-based modular synth for iOS that's designed to ease you into the West Coast synth method (where you add harmonics to a waveform to produce an effect) while still giving you room to grow.

Via: FACT, Synthtopia

Source: App Store

Sound-bending mini piano is all you need to become a DJ god

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In La La Land, too-cool-for-cover-bands and struggling jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) plays on the Roli Seaboard Grand, a $3,000 futuristic keyboard that warps sound based on presses, bends and slides, after joining Keith's (John Legend) band, The Messengers.

It's a sick keyboard for professionals, but at $3,000 it's far too pricey. That's why Roli's introducing the Seaboard Block, a half-sized version of the electronic instrument that's way more affordable at $300.

The Seaboard Block's the latest addition to Roli's modular Blocks family.  Read more...

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AirJamz is a wristband that turns air guitar into wear guitar

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/880f600aaa569897a3a4ccdcfd04de3d/203541987/DSC04380_800.jpg" />The <a href="http://www.air-jamz.com/">tagline reads</a>: "AirJamz is the wearable Air Guitar that you have to see to believe." To be fair, you probably <em>can</em> believe it, especially if you're familiar <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/07/21/zivix-puc-plus-midi-bluetooth/">with Zivix</a>. The company is best known <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/04/04/jamstik-plus-backpack-friendly-smart-guitar/">for Jamstik</a>, a small wireless guitar that helps you <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/11/jamstik-portable-midi-guitar-lets-you-play-and-learn-on-the-ipad/">learn to shred</a>, or play more than just axe-sounds, with your iPhone and iPad. AirJamz is for those that want to forego the whole playing part altogether, and just pretend they're slaying. Imagine <em>Guitar Hero</em> boiled down into a $50 wristband with an accelerometer and an app that "plays" guitar if you strum along in time and you've basically got it. We got to see it in action at SXSW, demoed by some of the world's finest fictional fretboard aficionados.
                                                <strong>Source: </strong><a  href="http://www.air-jamz.com/">Air-Jamz</a><!--//-->

AirJamz is a wristband that turns air guitar into wear guitar

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/880f600aaa569897a3a4ccdcfd04de3d/203541987/DSC04380_800.jpg" />The <a href="http://www.air-jamz.com/">tagline reads</a>: "AirJamz is the wearable Air Guitar that you have to see to believe." To be fair, you probably <em>can</em> believe it, especially if you're familiar <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/07/21/zivix-puc-plus-midi-bluetooth/">with Zivix</a>. The company is best known <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/04/04/jamstik-plus-backpack-friendly-smart-guitar/">for Jamstik</a>, a small wireless guitar that helps you <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/11/jamstik-portable-midi-guitar-lets-you-play-and-learn-on-the-ipad/">learn to shred</a>, or play more than just axe-sounds, with your iPhone and iPad. AirJamz is for those that want to forego the whole playing part altogether, and just pretend they're slaying. Imagine <em>Guitar Hero</em> boiled down into a $50 wristband with an accelerometer and an app that "plays" guitar if you strum along in time and you've basically got it. We got to see it in action at SXSW, demoed by some of the world's finest fictional fretboard aficionados.
                                                <strong>Source: </strong><a  href="http://www.air-jamz.com/">Air-Jamz</a><!--//-->

Native Instruments uses 3D Touch for better mobile beat making

        <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2015/11/12/native-instruments-imaschine-2/"><img data-credit="Native Instruments" data-mep="1042685" src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/b81590946d6aadb79b6c0d307ad15671/202969594/NI_iMaschine_2_iPhone_Step_Mode_02.jpg" alt="" /></a>
Native Instruments is a huge player in the music production and DJ world. Its Traktor DJ software and (myriad) hardware controllers are a favorite with digital crate diggers. The company also manages to squeeze Traktor (and Maschine) into surprisingly comprehensive iOS apps -- but there's obviously a trade off. That gap in functionality shrinks a little today with iMaschine 2, which has the ability to make complete songs (not just loops), and puts Apple's 3D Touch -- a feature that's ripe for music making apps such as these -- to clever use.

Apple Music in the UK: what you need to know

Apple Music After months of waiting, Apple Music is finally upon us. The company is now ready to take the wraps off its new streaming service, which will deliver millions of tracks on demand, host a free 24-hour radio station with slots from some of the world's biggest artists, and include a bevvy of social features. It'll go live in over 100 countries today (June 30th), but as is often the case with new Apple services, there's still some uncertainty around what you get and how much it'll set you back. Fear not, for we've pieced together everything you need to know about Apple Music in the UK. Read on to find out. Filed under: , Comments Source: Apple Music

Apple Music arrives June 30th at 11AM Eastern, Beats 1 an hour later

Apple Music
Determined to try Apple Music and its accompanying Beats 1 radio the very moment they're available on June 30th? The streaming service's senior director, Ian Rogers, is happy to help those early adopter impulses. He says that iOS 8.4 (and thus Apple Music) will be available at 11AM Eastern on that day, and Beats 1 will go on the air one hour later. It's not clear what you'll hear if you tune in to the station right away, but the first slate of programming will include an interview with Eminem as well as appearances from everyone from Cara Delevigne to (unsurprisingly) Beats brand co-founder Dr. Dre. Filed under: , , Comments Via: MacRumors Source: Fistfulayen, Beats 1 (Twitter), Zane Lowe (Twitter)

Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference begins June 8th

WWDC 2015
If you're wondering what Apple will do next with its mobile devices and the Mac, you won't have to wait too long to find out. The tech giant has announced the 2015 Worldwide Developer Conference, which starts on June 8th. It's not providing too many clues as to what will be there, but you can apply for tickets now -- and you'll have the option to stream sessions live if you can't make it out to San Francisco. It's safe to say that the event will include news on software for the Apple Watch, iOS and OS X, and it won't be shocking if Apple has something to say about a new streaming music service or a next-generation Apple TV. Whatever happens, you know we'll be there to give you the full scoop. Filed under: , , , , , , , Comments Source: Apple Developer, Apple

Apple’s iOS 8.4 beta includes a brand-new music player

iOS 8.4's music app

Think that iOS' music player is overdue for a remake? You're going to get your wish. Apple has released the first iOS 8.4 beta to developers, and its centerpiece is a shiny, new Music app. The refresh includes at least a few long-sought changes, including some borrowed from iTunes: There's a mini player that sticks around while you're browsing, global search and an "Up Next" song queue. You'll also see a sleeker iTunes Radio interface that helps you discover new tracks. There's no sign of the Beats-based music service rumored to come alongside 8.4, but that's not supposed to show up until Apple's developer conference at the earliest -- if it exists, it's probably going to stay under wraps for a little while. [Image credit: 9to5Mac] Filed under: , , , Comments Source: 9to5Mac

Amazon Prime Music now offers radio stations on iOS

Amazon Prime Music stations on an iPhone

Dig Amazon Prime Music on your iPhone, but would rather not go sifting through songs or playlists when you just want to start streaming? You don't have to after today. At long last, Amazon has updated Prime Music's iOS app to bring in Prime Stations, ad-free radio feeds based on artists and genres, much like what you'd get if you paid for Pandora or Spotify (minus their larger catalogs, mind you). And if you do want more control, there are also personalized recommendations that suggest playlists and tracks based on what you've listened to in the past. While this probably won't get you to switch to Amazon's music service if you weren't already a fan, it will give you one more reason to keep that Prime subscription going. Filed under: , , , Comments Via: TechCrunch Source: App Store

Google Play Music finally equips iPads with its tunes

Even if you prefer iOS, Google Play Music is still a solid option for getting your personal library and access to streaming all in one place. That is, until Apple reveals its plans for Beats Music. While we wait for that announcement, though, Mountain View's tune-minded app does double duty nicely, and now it properly outfits the iPad. The new version comes with a fresh coat of Material Design, of course, but you'll still have to contend with Google's rather frustrating method for uploading files. If you haven't already been prompted to update, the latest is now available over at iTunes. Filed under: , Comments Via: The Verge Source: iTunes

Google Play Music finally equips iPads with its tunes

Even if you prefer iOS, Google Play Music is still a solid option for getting your personal library and access to streaming all in one place. That is, until Apple reveals its plans for Beats Music. While we wait for that announcement, though, Mountain View's tune-minded app does double duty nicely, and now it properly outfits the iPad. The new version comes with a fresh coat of Material Design, of course, but you'll still have to contend with Google's rather frustrating method for uploading files. If you haven't already been prompted to update, the latest is now available over at iTunes. Filed under: , Comments Via: The Verge Source: iTunes

Spotify’s iOS app gets equalizer feature with custom settings and 22 presets

Spotify's latest iOS app update rolls out today and adds a new equalizer to playback functionality. "A lot of our users have been asking for a built-in equalizer for a while now and it's currently one of our most requested features on iOS," says Sten Garmark, VP for Product at Spotify. The update also folds the Discover function into the Browse tab on iPhones and adds a redesigned Artist page to the iPad iteration, featuring musicians' latest releases and... merchandise. Android users have been able to add third-party equalizers to music playback on dedicated music apps for years, although there's no word from Spotify as to when these new feature will hit Google's mobile OS. We're hoping that equalizer will help even out music playback -- even if you're only packing underwhelming in-box buds. Filed under: , Comments Source: Spotify (iTunes)

IK Multimedia iKlip Xpand: Versatile mic stand support for iPad

IK Multimedia, iKlip Xpand, Accessories, iPad, iPad mini
iPads are a great musician's tool, but it's difficult to figure out ways to mount the iPad on a microphone stand. Some musicians I know just used a regular music stand, but there's always the concern that swiping the screen may make the iPad slide off. Sure, you can always grab a roll of gaffer's tape to tie that iPad down, but it tends to leave a sticky residue behind. And there's always NewerTech's GripBase Podium, but if you don't want to buy a new stand -- just a way to hold the iPad -- you were pretty much out of luck until now. IK Multimedia has introduced the iKlip Xpand (US$49.99) to give your iPad or other tablet a secure place to hang while you're busy making music. The design of the iKlip Xpand is brilliant. It has expandable arms that can hold tablets ranging is size from 7 to 12.1 inches measured diagonally. The way those arms are arranged leaves all of the ports and buttons unobstructed, so it's not an issue to keep your device connected to your other stage electronics. The grip points on the arms are rubber-lined to make sure your precious tablet doesn't get scratched. On the back of the Xpand is a ball joint that makes it incredibly easy to adjust the iPad to just about any orientation you can imagine. The mic stand clamp is adjustable and will grip onto any vertical mic stand or horizontal boom up to 1.2 inches (30 mm) in diameter. If you're going to be looking at sheet music on the iKlip Xpand, IK Multimedia has you covered there as well, since they include a download code for the iKlip Stage app for music score management and page turning. Well, at least that's what the PR says -- the app isn't available for download at this time. IK Multimedia makes it simple to both register the iKlip Xpand and to download the app; there's a small card with QR codes for both the registration and download. Just use a QR-scanning app for your iPhone or iPad (I use Scanbot for both document and QR code scanning) and you're ready to roll. I put the iKlip Xpand to the test not on a microphone or music stand, but on the nearest equivalent I could find -- my trusty Manfrotto monopod with its little foldable tripod legs. I figured it would be a good test simply because the monopod tubing is a bit larger in diameter than that on most mic stands. First, the short "arm" of the iKlip Xpand is attached by screwing in a long bolt with a plastic knob on the end of it. Next, you use a shorter bolt to attach another piece that holds the ball joint on the back of the iKlip Xpand into position. That's it -- now you can grab your favorite tablet and pop it into the jaws of the iKlip Xpand.

IK Multimedia, iKlip Xpand, Accessories, iPad, iPad mini Those jaws are wide enough that I was even able to put an iPad Air -- in a keyboard case -- onto the stand. While the Kensington KeyFolio Thin X3 is relatively thin, it's reassuring to know that most iPads in standard cases have no problems being held in place in the jaws of the iKlip Xpand. Changing orientation of the iPad was a piece of cake. I just loosened the short bolt a tad, moved the iPad, then tightened it up again. Job done. My two negatives about the iKlip Xpand are rather minor; first, I think the price tag is a bit high considering that it doesn't include a full telescoping stand like the $58 GripBase Podium from NewerTech, and second, I wish that IK Multimedia had waited for the iKlip Stage app to be available before shipping this accessory.

IK Multimedia, iKlip Xpand, Accessories, iPad, iPad mini


If you use an iPhone or iPod touch as your music-making machine, there's also the iKlip Xpand mini ($39.99) to keep your phone or phablet in place.

Conclusion IK Multimedia continues to make amazing products for iOS device-using musicians, and the iKlip Xpand is another example of the company's commitment to the world of music. The device adjusts to fit just about any version of iPad or iPad mini, and the ability to clamp it onto a variety of horizontal or vertical mic stands provides a lot of flexibility.

Rating: 3-1/2 stars out of 4 stars possible

Three and one half star rating out of four stars possible

IK Multimedia iKlip Xpand: Versatile mic stand support for iPad originally appeared on TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004IK Multimedia iKlip Xpand: Versatile mic stand support for iPad originally appeared on TUAW: Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Fri, 18 Jul 2014 18:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Apogee Duet and Quartet audio interfaces for Mac and iOS

Apogee's Duet (US$495) and Quartet ($1395) are the respective steps up from Apogee's ONE, a single input interface with a built-in condenser mic. You can check out the review of the ONE here, but suffice to say it's a high-quality interface for those looking for a compact and portable recording solution. With Apogee's premium reputation and price, I wanted to put the Duet and Quartet through a real-world recording environment test, with people who really know what to expect when it comes to recording audio. To help me do this I enlisted the help of three professionals who work in the music business day-in and day-out. Jonathan McMillan, a Canadian born, London-based mix and mastering engineer based at Blue Pro Mastering. Matt Weeks, London-based session musician and producer at WeeksWeeksWeeks. And finally, Paul Evans, a London-based session drummer, producer and programmer. With these three guys, there are years of professional recording experience in hand. The four of us spent the morning at Smokehouse Studios to see just what the Duet and Quartet have to offer. Hardware Where the ONE is a sturdy and solid piece of kit, there's no doubt that the Duet and Quartet take things to the next level. Both interfaces look and feel professional and premium. Where the ONE is made from plastic, the Duet and Quartet are encased in aluminum akin to Apple's Mac lineup. Via breakout cable, the Duet has 2 inputs (XLR and 1/4") and left and right (1/4") outputs. The inputs operate at 24-bit/192kHz recording. There's also a headphones output directly on the Duet interface, totaling 4 outputs with independent speaker and headphone outs. This multitude of outputs can be controlled and customized in Apogee's Maestro App. For example, a drummer could send himself a click track while sending the backing track to the front-of-house. All the spec details on the Duet can be found on Apogee's website, here. The Quartet has 4 inputs ((XLR and 1/4") and an additional 8 channels of digital input via optical connection (ADAT/SMUX), if you have an additional analog-to-digital converter kicking around. The Quartet has 6 balanced (1/4" TRS) outputs, which means you could hook up three different stereo monitor sets. All the spec details on the Quartet can be found at Apogee's website, here. Both interfaces have MIDI input via USB -- which the ONE missed out on -- high resolution OLED displays, assignable touch pads to speed up your workflow, and USB 2.0 connectivity, which Apogee says provides more than enough bandwidth to handle the talk between interface and Mac. Both interfaces use Apgoee's ESS Sabre32 32-bit Hyperstream DAC with Time Domain Jitter Eliminator technology, which Apogee says "offers unequalled dynamic range, ultra low distortion, and unmatched audio clarity free from input jitter." You can learn more about the technology here Finally, as with the ONE, both interfaces are iOS compatible, bringing Apogee's high-fidelity recording to the world of iOS. Both interfaces come with the required connectors and adaptors to connect to older and newer iPads and iPhones. Performance The goal of our test was to see how well the preamps and converters of the Duet and Quartet faired against a reference benchmark, which was Smokehouse Studio's Cadac E-Type console preamp running into a Radar iZ Corp. We ran the Duet and Quartet directly into Macs and the Cadac preamp went into the Radar converter. We recorded a vocal and guitar take through each of the interfaces using a Nuemann u47 for the vocal and a Nuemann u87 on the acoustic guitar. We then listened to and compared the results through the studio's monitors. At times it felt like we were splitting hairs, but we could all agree on the following conclusions: We found that while the Duet held up well as a 2-input interface in its price range, the Quartet produced noticeably better results. We found the Quartet had a clearer and more detailed quality than the Duet. Of course, the Quartet is more than double the price of the Duet, so in some respects that makes sense. However, we were disappointed to find that the Duet wasn't simply a 2-input version of what the Quartet has to offer. That being said, in no way did the Duet produce a sub-par sound. It's just that the Quartet had more to offer when it came to audio fidelity. As expected, against the studio's Radar converters and Cadac preamps, the Quartet didn't quite match up. However, there was discussion at length as to just how much of a difference there was and the different kinds of sounds that were produced. Naturally, the Cadac and Radar are world-class hardware, where as, as Apogee states, the Quartet is a class-leading product. Conclusion There's no doubt that the Duet and Quartet are fantastic recording interfaces that work seamlessly with OS X (and iOS). Both Matt and Paul said they'd happily use either on a recording project, where as Jonathan was a little more picky. However, out of the two we all agreed that we'd go for the Quartet on a project if we had the choice. If you're in the market for a 2-input interface, the Duet is a fantastic sounding and beautiful looking interface that produces high-quality results. It's super easy to use and has a wonderful on-board control and metering system. For those looking for two extra inputs and three stereo outputs for monitoring, the Quartet is steep in price, but worth every penny. We were truly impressed by the sound produced by the preamps and converters found in the Quartet. Coupled with the enhanced on-board control and metering option, the Quartet is a stand out interface. Honestly, you could get more inputs for less, but you'd likely struggle to match the quality the Quartet offers.

Apogee Duet and Quartet audio interfaces for Mac and iOS originally appeared on Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Fri, 04 Jul 2014 15:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004Apogee Duet and Quartet audio interfaces for Mac and iOS originally appeared on Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Fri, 04 Jul 2014 15:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Using iRing Is Like Making Beats While Practicing Karate

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The number of gesture-based wearable devices and systems increases on a monthly basis. But not all gesture tech is created equal, a fact that has led many to question some of the fantastic claims made by new entrants in the space The iRing is different, however. It happens to be one of those rare gesture controllers that works as advertised

IK Multimedia's touch-less MIDI controller and associated music creation apps can recognize your movements almost instantaneously, allowing you to create powerful electronic music performances by simply moving your hands in mid-air Read more... More about Music, Apps, Iphone, Software, and Reviews

Apogee ONE: An audio interface and microphone for Mac and iOS

Apogee's revamped ONE (US$349) is a 2 IN 2 OUT USB audio interface with a built-in microphone for Mac and now iOS, too. This means you can plug the interface into your Mac or straight into your iPhone or iPad (via Apple's newer Lightning connector or the legacy 30-pin dock connector) to record audio. The ONE's built-in microphone means that you can get to recording straight away, without the need for additional cables or mics. Apogee is a name synonymous with high quality mic preamps, AD/DA converters and clocking found in its high-end studio products, like the Symphony. These products are used by professional musicians and studio engineers around the world. Does the ONE live up to the renowned name and reputation of Apogee? Read on to find out. Hardware The revamped ONE (2013) replaces Apogee's first generation ONE (2009), which had just the single input and was not compatible with iOS devices. The original ONE was USB 1.1 compatible, Mac: bus powered, had a 24 bit, 44.1/48kHz sample rate and cost US$249. The new ONE beats its predecessor in all aspects, except price -- it'll cost you a $100 more. Aside from that, it offers low-latency USB 2 speeds, it's DC mains or battery powered (in addition to Mac: bus powering) and, finally, the new ONE has a 24 bit, up to 96kHz sample rate. The ONE is constructed with a die-cast aluminum body, which feels strong and sturdy. It's not heavy, and it's not particularly large (though taller than the original ONE), which is a good thing since it's intended to be extremely portable. The molded rubber base doesn't allow the ONE to go slipping off of surfaces either. There's just a single, large dial on the front of the ONE, which is used to operate all aspects of the device, though all operations can be carried out via Apogee's Maestro app for Mac and iOS, too. Above the dial is an LED input / output level meter and above that an LED input / output indicator (internal mic, external mic, instrument and volume). When using the ONE's built-in mic, it was particularly useful to have the level meter on the front of the device to reference input levels, instead of looking to my Mac or iOS device to see if things were peaking or too low. On the top of the device is a microphone / instrument input (expandable via breakout cable), a micro USB input (to connect to a Mac or iOS device) and a DC power input. All cables and the power supply are included with the ONE. The bottom side of the device has a 1/8" stereo output for headphones or powered speakers. The ONE's breakout cable gives you a 1/4″ instrument IN and an XLR IN. The devices allows you to have 2 simultaneous inputs: the instrument IN and the XLR mic IN or the built-in mic with the instrument IN. Of course, you can just use the ONE's built-in mic without the breakout cable attached. On the rear of the device is a battery compartment for two AA batteries, though these were not included. Powering the ONE with batteries eliminates the power supply from the mix when using the ONE with an iOS device, which dramatically adds to its practicality in a portable context. One glaring omission is MIDI input, especially for a device that's iOS compatible. With so many apps designed for MIDI use on iOS, it feels like the ONE's missing a trick. Performance on iOS Connecting the ONE to my iPad was just as easy as connecting it to my Mac. However, the first hurdle was power. iPads and iPhones won't power the ONE like a Mac does, so I opted to use the included power supply (though I could have gone for the battery option had I any to hand). On the plus side, using the power supply with the ONE meant that my iPad was charging instead of draining away. The next step was downloading Apogee's Maestro app, which is required for Mac as well. The app allows you to control all features of the ONE as well as improving latency issues. Once Maestro was installed, I launched GarageBand and got to adjusting settings. It took me a little while to get a good level because I was unfamiliar with the Maestro app. I found myself repeatedly switching between GarageBand and Maestro, trying to get a level that didn't peak, but wasn't too quiet. I found this process cumbersome, but once I was a bit more familiar with Maestro, things seemed to improve. That being said, The Maestro app does feel like a bit of a third wheel. The interface is akin to its desktop counterpart. Although that may be a comfort to those who've used it on the Mac, it doesn't feel at home on iOS. Buttons and sliders are small, for example, particularly on the iPhone. It's still workable, but a Maestro app designed solely with iOS users in mind would go a long way to improving the experience. Performance on OS X Really, there's not much to say here. If you've used an Apogee interface with a Mac, you know it's a solid combination. The ONE felt right at home with my Mac. I can't put my finger on it -- maybe it was simply familiarity -- but everything worked as you'd expect it to. The Maestro app is still required, but it does fit much better in place on OS X than iOS. Results Once I got to some recording, I was really surprised with the results. Using a Rode NT 2000, I found I was getting some fantastic results for the first time on my iPad. Similarly, things sounded great on OS X running Logic. But for me, the big surprise was actually the ONE's built-in microphone. It admirably handled whatever I threw at it. Once I realized how compelling the built-in mic was, the ONE began to make sense to me. You see, there are many external mics for iOS out there, but the ONE's mic in combination with Apogee-designed preamps and digital audio converters makes it a compelling package for recording audio on iOS (or Mac). You really can just plug in and record. There's no need for additional cables or mics. And you do get a fantastic sound out of it. Conclusion Plugging the ONE straight into my Mac and putting something down at a moments notice is a real plus, especially when the quality of the audio sounds this good. More so, for those moments where it's easier to grab your iPhone or iPad, the ONE produces the same results. The revamped ONE carries Apogee's name well. For its class, it's got stand-out preamps and converters and a built-in mic that really impresses, with expandability if you need it. And all of this in a highly compact and portable form factor. If you're looking for that kind of convenience, but without skimping on quality, the ONE is a solid choice.

Apogee ONE: An audio interface and microphone for Mac and iOS originally appeared on Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Wed, 25 Jun 2014 09:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004Apogee ONE: An audio interface and microphone for Mac and iOS originally appeared on Apple news, reviews and how-tos since 2004 on Wed, 25 Jun 2014 09:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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