Of course there’s retro-inspired ‘Stranger Things’ mobile game

Netflix has flirted with simple games starring its most popular original series, but its latest stab at interactive promo goes a little deeper. The streaming juggernaut tapped developer BonusXP to make a full-on mobile game for Stranger Things. And as you might expect, it's is about as retro as possible, aping classics of yore like River City Ransom and the NES' Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for inspiration. All that to say, it's a bit more complicated than Netflix Infinite Runner from January. You can do sweet jumps on your bicycle as one of the kids and explore the Upside Down as Hawkins police chief Jim Hopper, for example.

Source: iTunes, Google Play

Recommended Reading: Netflix trims its library of original shows

'The Get Down,' 'Sense8'
Cancellations Signal
That Netflix's Originals
Are 'Destructible'

Daniel Holloway,
Variety

In the span of about a week, Netflix cancelled both The Get Down and Sense8 -- two noteworthy series from its slate of original shows. The streaming service seemingly renewed everything, but now a couple of its more anticipated shows won't return. Variety has a look at what this means for the company, including reasons why these two shows in particular won't be coming back. It turns out producing a Baz Luhrmann show is even more expensive than initially anticipated.

The Engadget Podcast Ep 35: TV Party

On this episode host Terrence O'Brien is joined by executive editor Dana Wollman and (eventually) senior editor Chris Velazco. They start by looking at the current state of cord cutting and weigh the value of YouTube's new live streaming TV package. Then they'll try to figure out what the benefit is of Netflix ditching its five star rating system for a simplified option of just thumbs up or thumbs down. Obviously you can watch YouTube and Netflix on an actual television, but portable screens are an increasingly important part of the media market. How does the new 2017 iPad stack up in that world of mobile media machines? Well, pretty good if you ask Chris -- at $329 it doesn't seem to have too many competitors.

Lastly the trio sign off by recommending an album that will make you cry, a movie that will make you pee your pants and Continue reading "The Engadget Podcast Ep 35: TV Party"

Netflix has another app now, but it’s for DVD and Blu-ray movies

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/dims-shared/dims3/GLOB/crop/3500x2333+0+0/resize/1600x1067!/format/jpg/quality/85/http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/2ab35639a85734095582f892285993c7/204766889/RTX14IZN.jpeg" />Last year, Netflix used its CES keynote speech to <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2016/01/06/netflix-teams-with-lg-for-prepaid-streaming-worldwide/">announce the launch</a> of (nearly) worldwide access to streaming. This year it won't take the stage directly, but ahead of the show it's <a href="http://blog.dvd.netflix.com/new-dvd-releases/new-year-new-app">highlighting</a> something a little more limited in appeal: an app built for its 4.2 million or so remaining DVD rental customers. These days the disc side of the business is <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2011/07/12/netflix-dvd-only-unlimited-plan-appears-price-for-streaming-and/">billed separately</a> and segmented <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2012/03/30/netflix-dvd-com-domain/">over on DVD.com</a>, but it's reportedly <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/27/business/while-its-streaming-service-booms-netflix-streamlines-old-business.html">still profitable</a>. Managing your queue of discs (which often includes movies and TV shows that have left streaming, or never show up there at all), has been missing from official apps since it <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2011/03/03/netflix-for-ipad-updated-with-a-new-custom-ui-but-loses-feature/">disappeared after an update back in 2011.</a>
                                                <strong>Source: </strong><a  href="http://blog.dvd.netflix.com/new-dvd-releases/new-year-new-app">Netflix DVD Blog</a><!--//-->, <a  href="https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=1169772776&amp;mt=8">iTunes</a><!--//-->

Netflix now does picture-in-picture video on your iPad

                    <img src="http://o.aolcdn.com/hss/storage/midas/28cdfc20e365c9a6de8123aad8a5b257/203954876/s.aolcdn-ed.jpg" />Ever since Apple introduced picture-in-picture video in <a href="https://www.engadget.com/2015/09/22/ios-9-review/">iOS 9</a>, iPad owners have been wondering one thing: when can I use the feature with Netflix? At last, it's here. An <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/app/netflix/id363590051?mt=8">update</a> to the iOS app has introduced picture-in-picture for any iPad running at least iOS 9.3.2, giving you an easy way to keep that <em>House of Cards</em> marathon going while you check email or chat with friends. Netflix is more than a little late to the party (<a href="https://www.engadget.com/2015/09/16/hulu-picture-in-picture-on-ipad/">Hulu</a> and others had the feature soon after iOS 9 arrived), but it's good to know that the streaming service is listening to what viewers want.
                                                <strong>Source: </strong><a href="https://itunes.apple.com/app/netflix/id363590051?mt=8" >App Store</a><!--//-->

No, it wasn’t just you: Netflix went down Tuesday afternoon

Netflix experienced an extended outage this Tuesday afternoon, with users reporting on Twitter that it went down around 3:40pm PT, according to Downdetector.com. Netflix’s website remained inaccessible for a little over an hour, and streaming on mobile devices didn’t work either. Netflix acknowledged the outage on Twitter:
But a little over an hour after the first reports came in, Netflix managed to get back online:
Netflix has been working hard to make its cloud-based infrastructure more resilient. Last fall, the company’s service managed to stay online despite Amazon rebooting 218 of its servers. However, even Netflix isn’t immune
Continue reading "No, it wasn’t just you: Netflix went down Tuesday afternoon"

No, it wasn’t just you: Netflix went down Tuesday afternoon

Netflix experienced an extended outage this Tuesday afternoon, with users reporting on Twitter that it went down around 3:40pm PT, according to Downdetector.com. Netflix’s website remained inaccessible for a little over an hour, and streaming on mobile devices didn’t work either. Netflix acknowledged the outage on Twitter:
But a little over an hour after the first reports came in, Netflix managed to get back online:
Netflix has been working hard to make its cloud-based infrastructure more resilient. Last fall, the company’s service managed to stay online despite Amazon rebooting 218 of its servers. However, even Netflix isn’t immune
Continue reading "No, it wasn’t just you: Netflix went down Tuesday afternoon"

Why your Spotify or Netflix for print content is probably doomed

Services like Magzter and NextIssue promise a digital version of the old-fashioned newsstand, where people can flip through the virtual pages of their favorite magazines -- but that's not the way most people consume content any more Why your Spotify or Netflix for print content is probably doomed originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.
<a href="https://gigaom.com/2015/01/19/why-your-spotify-or-netflix-for-print-content-is-probably-doomed/?utm_source=feed&#038;utm_medium=feed&%23038;utm_campaign=feed">Continue reading&hellip;</a>

A look back at the first quarter of 2014

Cleantech appears to be turning the corner after some very difficult years. Positive acquisitions are occurring and public market performance of cleantech companies highlights growth prospects at market leaders like SolarCity, SunPower, and Tesla. A look back at the first quarter of 2014 originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2014.
<a href="http://research.gigaom.com/report/cleantech-first-quarter-2014-analysis-and-outlook/?utm_source=feed&#038;utm_medium=feed&%23038;utm_campaign=feed">Continue reading&hellip;</a>.

How mobile will disrupt the living room in 2014

The shift from fixed to mobile platforms has the potential to disrupt the TV advertising economy by enabling new ways to aggregate, measure and engage with audiences beyond the exclusive control of TV programmers. How mobile will disrupt the living room in 2014 originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2014.
<a href="http://research.gigaom.com/report/mobile-disruption-in-the-living-room-in-2014/?utm_source=feed&#038;utm_medium=feed&%23038;utm_campaign=feed">Continue reading&hellip;</a>.

How the truly smart home could finally become a reality

For the smart home to ignite the IoT, home automation software platform vendors must provide open APIs. SmartThings and future open-API platforms could be the disruptive players that encourage a tidal wave of interconnected things.


Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:
Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.

How consumer media consumption shifted in the second quarter

The shift in consumer media consumption from fixed, dedicated platforms to open, IP-based platforms caused problems for both in the second quarter. The period also saw a courtroom showdown between Apple and the Justice Department over ebook prices and a set-back for 3DTV.


Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:
Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.

The Daily Roundup for 04.16.2013

DNP The Daily RoundUp

You might say the day is never really done in consumer technology news. Your workday, however, hopefully draws to a close at some point. This is the Daily Roundup on Engadget, a quick peek back at the top headlines for the past 24 hours -- all handpicked by the editors here at the site. Click on through the break, and enjoy.

Comments

Netflix 3.0 for iOS brings UI improvements

Netflix has been steadily improving its iOS app since it debuted back in 2010. The latest version hit the app store yesterday and includes a few tweaks that improve the overall experience of the app.

Netflix 3.0 includes a new iPad-only feature that'll display the title of the TV episode or movie that you are watching when you tap on the screen. Users will also notice that Netflix revamped the layout for the play/pause/back buttons, making them easier to use. Lastly, Netflix brought back the zoom icon so you can easily jump to fullscreen mode.

You can grab the Netflix app from the iOS App Store for free. It requires a monthly Netflix subscription, which starts at US$7.99 per month.

[Via Engadget]

Netflix 3.0 for iOS brings UI improvements originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Thu, 21 Feb 2013 12:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

TUAW - The Unofficial Apple WeblogNetflix 3.0 for iOS brings UI improvements originally appeared on TUAW - The Unofficial Apple Weblog on Thu, 21 Feb 2013 12:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Netflix 3.0 for iOS brings the zoom icon back, adds more UI improvements

Netflix for iOS v30 brings the zoom icon back, adds more UI improvements

Sony's now obsolete PS3 may be the Netflix streaming device of choice, but that doesn't mean the popular streaming service will ignore other platforms. The Netflix app on iOS, which saw its last big refresh back in September last year, has just been bumped up to v3.0 -- bringing with it a slew of UI changes aimed towards improving your movie-watching experience. The zoom icon that was removed previously is now back for easier access to full-screen viewing, while a tap displays video titles if you're using the app on the iPad. The three-point change log also includes a relocation of the playback controls. Nothing profound, but hey -- could be worth your while if it keeps you away from reality just a little longer.

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Source: App Store