Does Apple’s simplified Mac lineup have a hole in it?


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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When Steve Jobs came back to Apple, one of his early moves was to vastly simplify what had become a bloated line-up of Mac hardware. Jobs famously showed off a two-by-two product grid: pro and consumer, desktop and portable. Filling the grid were four products—iMac, PowerMac, iBook, PowerBook—each addressing one of those combinations.

The two-by-two grid lasted for several years, until the debut of the category-busting Mac mini in 2005. Since then, there’s been an almost magnetic impulse to cite the grid as the holy grail of Apple product design aspirations. Every time Apple releases something a new Mac, pundits try desperately to figure out how to shove the latest addition into the already bulging grid.

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Jony Ive is gone, but he won’t take Apple with him


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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The more things change, the more they stay the same.

Here we are, once again debating whether or not the departure of a single prominent Apple employee signals doom for the company. This time it’s designer extraordinaire Jony Ive who’s leaving the company, though the reception to his exit is decidedly mixed. Some feel Ive is the embodiment of an Apple that’s placed too high a value on form over function; others worry that the company won’t be able to keep delivering world-class design without him. Neither of these is precisely true—and they’re definitely not both true.

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Features that should be in Apple’s upcoming OS releases but aren’t


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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As we get further away from this year’s Worldwide Developers Conference, the reality of Apple’s latest OS upgrades are beginning to sink in. That’s even more the case this week, as the release of Apple’s public betas for iOS, iPadOS, tvOS, and macOS arrived slightly earlier than expected.

Of course, betas, like the future, are always in motion, and there’s no guarantee that what we see now is what will end up shipping in the fall—but usually the tweaks between then and now are on the minor side, more about stability and usability than big foundational changes.

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3 products that would be hits for Apple if the company made them


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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Being a big business is all about making choices. Even the most successful, most profitable company can’t pursue all possible avenues. Decisions have to be made, even if they mean ignoring a segment of the market that might address some consumers.

Such is the reality with Apple. It can’t possibly make all of the products that its customers want—it just does’t have the time, money, or people. But some of the choices that Apple has made about products to not pursue have been surprising. Especially when it seems as though the market in question is desperately in need of a solution that would be right up Apple’s alley.

Earlier this month, during the company’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference keynote, I noticed a few places where it seemed as though Apple was missing out on an opportunity. Some of these might be cases where the company has decided it doesn’t want Continue reading "3 products that would be hits for Apple if the company made them"

Reading between the lines of Apple’s WWDC announcements


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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There’s only so much information one can digest in a single sitting. Even a week after Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference wrapped up, we’re still sifting through the details of the company’s announcements. And that’s before the deluge of users even installing the public beta.

But beyond just the features that Apple has included (or hasn’t) in the next versions of its software platforms, there’s also a lot to glean from these announcements about the company’s future plans. In some cases they’re obvious; in others, you just need to read between the lines a little bit. As I pored over Apple’s website, I noticed a few things that made me think about what the folks in Cupertino might have in store.

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WWDC: What Apple’s biggest announcements means for the company


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


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As Apple’s biggest event of the year winds down and the dust begins to settle, the shape of company’s future plans is starting to become clearer. And this time around it’s not a matter of digging up a mere smattering of hints about where Apple is taking its products, but of sifting through the metric ton of details that the company divulged. Most people were convinced that this would be a big event, and they were ultimately right—even if not for the reasons initially suspected.

Here are just a few of the big takeaways from the announcements, with an idea of what they might mean for the future of the company’s products.

Putting the “Pad” in “iOS”

Though the iPad has long been one of Apple’s key products, this year it finally got the recognition it deserved as its own platform, as Apple decided to rechristen the tablet’s operating system Continue reading "WWDC: What Apple’s biggest announcements means for the company"

WWDC: What Apple’s biggest announcements mean for the company


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




As Apple’s biggest event of the year winds down and the dust begins to settle, the shape of company’s future plans is starting to become clearer. And this time around it’s not a matter of digging up a mere smattering of hints about where Apple is taking its products, but of sifting through the metric ton of details that the company divulged. Most people were convinced that this would be a big event, and they were ultimately right—even if not for the reasons initially suspected.

Here are just a few of the big takeaways from the announcements, with an idea of what they might mean for the future of the company’s products.

Putting the “Pad” in “iOS”

Though the iPad has long been one of Apple’s key products, this year it finally got the recognition it deserved as its own platform, as Apple decided to rechristen the tablet’s operating system Continue reading "WWDC: What Apple’s biggest announcements mean for the company"

Marzipan, Mac Pro, and iPad features: A wish list for WWDC19


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple’s annual extravaganza is just around the corner. By the time my next column rolls around, we’ll know all the secrets that Apple has been sitting on for the last year. (Well, many of those secrets, anyway.) The only real question is whether Apple executives will be going with untucked or tucked-in shirts? The excitement is palpable.

The Worldwide Developers Conference keynote is always a big high for the Apple-following community: wishes get fulfilled, hopes get dashed, and things appear that we never saw coming—and yet seem, in hindsight, totally obvious.

Everybody has their own list of things they want or expect to see. So, as we cast our glances forward a few days, here’s a rundown of the things that I’ll be looking to hear about when Tim Cook and his motley crew take the stage just a few days from now.

To read this article in full, Continue reading "Marzipan, Mac Pro, and iPad features: A wish list for WWDC19"

Marzipan, Mac Pro, and iPad features: A wish list for WWDC19


This post is by Dan Moren from Macworld


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple’s annual extravaganza is just around the corner. By the time my next column rolls around, we’ll know all the secrets that Apple has been sitting on for the last year. (Well, many of those secrets, anyway.) The only real question is whether Apple executives will be going with untucked or tucked-in shirts? The excitement is palpable.

The Worldwide Developers Conference keynote is always a big high for the Apple-following community: wishes get fulfilled, hopes get dashed, and things appear that we never saw coming—and yet seem, in hindsight, totally obvious.

Everybody has their own list of things they want or expect to see. So, as we cast our glances forward a few days, here’s a rundown of the things that I’ll be looking to hear about when Tim Cook and his motley crew take the stage just a few days from now.

To read this article in full, Continue reading "Marzipan, Mac Pro, and iPad features: A wish list for WWDC19"