How to install the macOS Catalina beta in its own APFS container


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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With the public beta out for macOS 10.15 Catalina, you might be a thrill seeker and want to test out the in-progress version. But maybe you’d like to hedge your bets. In the past, you’d need to partition your startup drive, which could turn into a lot of effort, or get an external drive—preferably SSD—and install and boot from that.

However, there’s a better way to have your Catalina and boot it, too. It’s even a path Apple documents and recommends.

With Apple’s not-quite-so-new APFS filesystem that replaces the long-running HFS+, drives are no longer organized into partitions, but volumes and containers. A container gets a pool of a fixed amount of storage on a drive when it’s configured, but containers can have multiple volumes. Volumes share all available free space within the container without requiring any other rejiggering—they grow and shrink automatically.

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Is iOS’s Do Not Disturb While Driving driving you around the bend? Change its behavior


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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People interacting with their phone while driving have been implicated in an enormous number of accidents. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says 3,166 people were outright killed as the result of distracted driving in 2017.

Apple added the Do Not Disturb While Driving feature in iOS 11 as a tool to help reduce distractions without you have to take extra steps. It leaves Siri enabled among a few other features. But the DND-While-D feature can trigger automatically when you’re not in the driver’s seat. You might be a passenger in a car or in another mode of transportation.

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Your Time Capsule has died. How can you wipe its data?


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A few days ago, I explained how to extract data from a Time Capsule networked drive and Wi-Fi router if you received a warning that you couldn’t back up to it as a destination. That was a “logical” solution, offering advice on archiving and reformatting.

But as Time Capsule age, they’re more likely to fail: the drive dies, the circuit board goes wonky, or the power supply poops out. If you can’t get the Time Capsule to power up or respond, how do you deal with the physical element of its drive? With a dead Time Capsule, you can’t easily extract the hard disk, either to recover it or erase it if you want to pass the unit on—or to destroy it to render the data unrecoverable.

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Best Mac remote access apps


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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Sometimes—maybe often—you need to access your Mac, but you’re not sitting in front of it. You might be an office away, across town, or on the other side of the world. For decades, the fix for this involves an ever-changing mix of remote-access software that can pierce network complexities, allowing you to remotely control or observe a computer. More modern flavors can pass along audio inputs and output, transfer files, and allow remote peripheral access.

In this round-up of remote-access software, I look at products that have the right mix of features and price to consider for personal, non-commercial use and for small business.

For multiple users who need to control a few computers

With LogMeIn Pro, remote access can be installed on one or two computers. But an unlimited number of different users can access those computers. It’s the right option for a small business that has software with Continue reading "Best Mac remote access apps"

TeamViewer review: Great remote-access system for personal use, but priced high for most business purposes


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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TeamViewer is a powerful remote-access tool designed for large-scale use, and combining remote screen control, remote file access, and robust ability to share the observation or control of screens among users. It bundles in text, audio conferencing, and video conferencing, and a single-user license allows the remote control of unlimited computers.

It’s also the most generous company out there where personal use is concerned. TeamViewer allows unlimited use of the full version of its software for non-commercial purposes, which the company offers a clear definition of (no direct or indirect revenue or business support).

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Splashtop review: affordable remote access app with core remote access options


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With a focus on just providing solid remote-access tools, Splashtop is far less expensive than its closest competitors, which include features that many users may not need, such as file storage, password management, and full-blown conferencing tools.

That approach appears to allow Splashtop to offer pricing that makes sense to individual users as well as some categories of business user. Splashtop Business Solo at $5 a month (billed at $60 a year) lets a single user access two computers. It offers a range of expected remote-access features, including remote printing, playing remote audio locally through client software, and managing a system with multiple moderns.

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LogMeIn Pro review: The right remote access when you have many users that need to control a few computers


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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LogMeIn provides straightforward remote access to a computer’s screen and files from a smartphone, tablet, or other computer. The company orients its approach around the number of computers available to control in a given account, rather than users.

With the LogMeIn Pro flavor of the service, remote access can be installed on one or two computers. But an unlimited number of different users can access those computers. It’s the right option for a small business that has software with a single-seat license or with massive files installed on a computer, and which wants multiple employees who aren’t on site to have access, or to have cross-platform access.

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Can’t download photos from your iPhone to your Mac? It could be a trust issue


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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Your Mac needs to trust your iPhone or iPad—and vice-versa. Apple added a Trust button to iOS years ago that appears when a device is connected to a computer, requiring a phone or tablet be unlocked and the connection confirmed. This was another layer in attempting to ensure that a device’s owner really wanted that computer to have access.

However, you can run afoul of this provision. My dad wrote to me from a small island on Greece recently after he’d swapped in a Greek carrier’s SIM for his unlocked AT&T iPhone. While voice, text, and data worked fine, whenever he plugged his iPhone into his laptop, he neither received a Trust dialog nor could get his phone’s images to appear as available with iTunes, Photos, or Image Capture.

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Getting Time Capsule failure warnings? Here’s what you can do


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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Apple no longer sells its Time Capsule, a combination of a backup drive, Time Machine, and an AirPort Extreme Base Station. However, many are in use, and some components inevitably fail, especially the internal hard drive.

If you receive an error on a Mac using the Time Capsule for Time Machine backups that you can no longer back up to it, you can try to work your way out of the problem by using AirPort Utility.

Warning! This approach erases all the backup snapshots stored on your Time Capsule. There may be no way to recover them—hence the error—but you should perform full Time Machine backups or disk clones of all devices that used the Time Capsule for archiving files, as well as trying step 4 below.

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Getting Time Capsule failure warnings? Here’s what you can do


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Apple no longer sells its Time Capsule, a combination of a backup drive, Time Machine, and an AirPort Extreme Base Station. However, many are in use, and some components inevitably fail, especially the internal hard drive.

If you receive an error on a Mac using the Time Capsule for Time Machine backups that you can no longer back up to it, you can try to work your way out of the problem by using AirPort Utility.

Warning! This approach erases all the backup snapshots stored on your Time Capsule. There may be no way to recover them—hence the error—but you should perform full Time Machine backups or disk clones of all devices that used the Time Capsule for archiving files, as well as trying step 4 below.

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How to set a higher dpi without changing an image’s resolution


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Some purposes require high-resolution images. Others require high-density ones. How can you tell the difference and provide what’s needed? Resolution and image pixel density are two separate concepts often blurred into the single term “resolution.” This makes it difficult to provide what’s needed.

Resolution refers effectively to the amount of information in an image, and more concretely to its dimensions measured in pixels. The amount of detail you capture in an image—whether a photo, scan, or graphic—is directly related to its resolution, as to capture ever more detail, you need ever more pixels. You might need quite a lot of pixels to provide a zoomable image of something with a lot of detail, like a machine, or to print a large-format photograph.

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Can’t erase your Mac’s startup disk? Try Internet Recovery as a last resort


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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When you’re trying to wipe an old Mac to set it up fresh or to give it away or sell it, you typically want to erase the drive. Sometimes, you’re thwarted.

The easiest sequence is the following:

  1. Select  > Restart if your Mac is running.

  2. Just as the computer starts, hold down Command-R, which loads macOS Recovery.

  3. Wait until the startup progress bar appears and release the keys. (If you see a globe, skip down to the end of the article.)

  4. When Recovery starts up, select Disk Utility and click Continue.

  5. Make sure you’re selecting your macOS startup partition and not the entire drive, which contains the macOS Recovery partition you’re currently using. Fom the View menu, select Show All Devices.

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How to delete large files for Steam and other apps


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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The Steam system for games makes it easy to purchase and download games onto a variety of devices you own across multiple computer platforms. Steam acts as a combination of platform, offering some gaming features available to all the apps it supports, and a purchase and copy-protection system. The key part, though, is that when you download a Steam game, the program code is wrapped up and loaded in a way that Steam can use.

However, to macOS, each game can still seem sort of like a standalone app. That becomes important only when you’re trying to clean out storage on your Mac to free up space.

One of the easiest ways to find items that you no longer need is to select  > About This Mac, click the Storage tab, and then click Manage. A window appears that calculates storage consumed across several categories, and lets you Continue reading "How to delete large files for Steam and other apps"

Use TripMode to press pause and conserve data on iCloud and other sync over a cellular hotspot


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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Data synchronization is a way to ensure that you’re always up to date across all your devices, no matter what changes, and you typically get an online backup as an extra.

But when you’re using a cellular-connected Wi-Fi hotspot, such as the Personal Hotspot on an iPhone or iPad, you might want to press pause on iCloud and other sync operations. The sync services can’t tell whether you’re connected via a Wi-Fi network directly to the internet or you’re using a cellular relay.

Many third-party sync and backup service offer a way to pause. That’s sometimes a button or menu option that let’s you pause until you later choose to resume; other times, it’s a specified period of time after which sync or backup starts up automatically

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Can’t download an app update? It might be time to update your Mac


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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There’s got to be the name for the paradox that occurs when you’re told by the Mac App Store that you both have an update for a free or purchased app and you can’t install it. Maybe it’s the Apprisoner’s Dilemma? You might experience this no-win situation when you see a message that says “[app name] can’t be installed on [device] because [OS X/macOS] version 10.[X] or later is required.”

This situation occurs when you’re running an older version of macOS than the minimum required for the latest version of the program’s updated code. App developers who routinely revise their apps earn our thanks for adding features, keeping them up to date with the latest system changes, and fixing bugs.

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Best antivirus for Mac: Protect yourself from malicious software


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Recover messages from a deleted mail account in Mail for macOS


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Sometimes you make a rookie mistake, like shutting down a hosted email account before you—well, before I—download all the messages that are stored on the server and synced to my Macs and iOS devices via IMAP. I felt like a dope. I had already contacted the mail hosting company, which retains deleted accounts for seven days for just this reason, when I realized I should have a full backup cached on my iMac.

This Mac is always on and the Mail app is always running. The account I’d just deleted should be fully synced with the cached download in Mail, so long as I didn’t restart my Mac or even quit Mail. If you quit or restart, it’s hard to know exactly what cached content would be temporarily deleted by Mail or macOS.

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How to make FileVault work again when you’re missing a ‘secure token’


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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Several months ago, we posted a column called “What to do when FileVault won’t turn on,” which offered a set of strategies when you couldn’t get macOS to let you enable FileVault, Apple’s full-disk encryption (FDE) technology. These worked for some people who have followed up with us. The most severe of the scenarios was the “nuclear option,” which required a full backup or clone of your Mac, erase the drive, reinstalling macOS, and restoring your previous files. This would always re-enable the FileVault capability, but it’s a big investment of time and effort.

I’d put off carrying it out on my MacBook, which had this problem, hoping another alternative would emerge. Fortunately, Rich Trouton has a solution at his Der Flounder site, where he often provides inside into tricky or unsolvable disk-formatting and encryption issues. (Thanks also to reader Christophe for alerting me to Trouton’s update.)

Continue reading "How to make FileVault work again when you’re missing a ‘secure token’"

Why use both Text Message Forwarding and Messages in iCloud?


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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It can sometimes be tricky to tease out the difference between two similar iOS or macOS features that aren’t quite identical. The option on an iPhone to enable Text Message Forwarding to other devices and the Messages in iCloud feature are a case in point. If you’re forwarding text messages, then why do you need to use iCloud at all? It has to do with notifications and availability.

The Messages app in iOS and macOS keeps some sense of “presence,” or which device you’ve interacting with. When a message arrives, the Apple ecosystem tries to prompt you first at the device you’re actively using or most recently used.

Without Text Message Forwarding enabled in Settings > Messages, only Apple’s iMessages (messages in blue bubbles) appear on all your devices and use presence to figure out which one to prioritize. Otherwise, text messages (in green bubbles)—whether plain text SMS or Continue reading "Why use both Text Message Forwarding and Messages in iCloud?"

Can’t import a .peg file? Use the Image Capture app


This post is by Glenn Fleishman from Macworld


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You’ve heard of a JPEG file, which typically has .jpeg or .jpg at the end of its name. But what’s a “.peg” file? Likely an error on JPEG files, and one that appears to have cropped up years ago but still plagues some users.

It’s unclear why some JPEG files wind up with a “.peg” suffix, even though the image data isn’t correct. However, confronted with a .peg file, Photos for macOS will pop up an error on import that notes it “couldn’t load an asset.” This stymies people, because you can’t rename files in Photos for iOS.

The solution winds up simple enough, however. It requires your Mac.

  1. On your Mac, launch Applications > Image Capture.

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